Paris Air Show

Elbit Displays Variety of Aerial Equipment

 - June 19, 2013, 1:10 PM
Plenty of new and unique equipment is on display in and outside Elbit Systems pavilion at the 2013 Paris Air Show. This includes the SPS-65-V5 self-protection system for the Hermes 900 and other UAVs; a wide-area full motion video sensor for the same drone; unattended ground sensors; and a "mini" version for helicopters of Music, the Elbit DIRCM system that protects airliners from ground-launched missiles. (Photo: David McIntosh)

Plenty of new and unique equipment is on display in and outside the Elbit Systems pavilion (Chalet A198), according to the Israeli company’s new president and CEO Butzi Machlis. This includes the SPS-65-V5 self-protection system for the Hermes 900 and other UAVs; a wide-area full motion video sensor for the same drone; unattended ground sensors; and a ‘mini’ version for helicopters of Music, the Elbit DIRCM system that protects airliners from ground-launched missiles. Meanwhile, the company’s U.S. subsidiary is showing a new version of the JHMCS helmet for combat aircraft pilots in Hall 3 E111.

The Hermes 900 standing outside the pavilion displays a range of advanced sensors, including the Gabbiano multi-mode radar from Selex ES; Elbit’s own Emerald AES-210 ESM system; Skyfix Comint receiver and SkyJam communication jammer; and Advanced Multi-Sensor Payload System. This is a highly stabilized electro-optical payload for long-range, stand-off missions, packaged with its own inertial and GPS navigation. The new full motion video sensor is named Skyeye and offers coverage of 100 sq km.

Inside the pavilion, there is Elbit’s vision for a new-generation cockpit for large aircraft. CockpitNG has one large central display that is fully integrated with helmet-mounted and head-up displays. Another display suite shows Elbit’s solution for C-130 upgrades, again integrating head-up, head-down or helmet-mounted displays.

The Music system is well represented. In addition to the new Mini-Music, the podded ‘C’ version is hung from the pavilion ceiling. It is flying on a Boeing 737 and a KC-135s and can be fitted or removed in 30 minutes. The ‘J’ version for large aircraft, which consists of the sensors and lasers distributed around the aircraft, is also on display. Other aircraft that are flying with protection from Music include AgustaWestland AW101s, Alenia C-27Js, Lockheed Martin C-130Js and the forthcoming Embraer KC-390.

Elbit also has an aerostructures business named Cyclone. It is display a composite winglet that is manufactured using a three-step weight saving method, and a composite aileron that uses resin transfer moulding.

Machlis said that the company’s sales are increasing, despite defense budget reductions in many countries. Elbit’s turnover last year was $2.88 billion, and it has a backlog of $5.78 billion, he reported. Only 18 percent of that turnover is from Israel.