Star Navigation Offers Real-Time Aircraft Tracking

 - June 16, 2014, 1:05 PM

The latest version of Star Navigation’s Star-ISMS flight safety monitoring system is designed to supplement an aircraft’s on-board digital flight data recorders through its ability to transmit real-time information to ground stations at user-defined intervals. The new system also provides after-landing reports, intelligent flight data transmission and more detailed live flight data alerts to ground personnel through satellite communications.

One of the main features of the Star-ISMS is its built-in GPS tracking software, which enables more accurate tracking of an airplane to the last known latitude and longitude. Also, it can instantly provide an aircraft’s exact altitude, heading and airspeed. The essential avionics and diagnostic information collected is transmitted at operator-defined intervals or triggered events, via satellite, to ground-based installations in real time regardless of weather conditions.

Star’s onboard hardware and software will also independently analyze all selected incoming sensor and systems data and compare it with normal parameters and generate an alert automatically if necessary. In the event of multiple failures, an automated mayday feature begins an immediate data dump that sends as much information as bandwidth will allow.

Comments

jeep4josh's picture

This is a commercial solution that mimics the Automatic Dependant Surveillance-Broadcast Out (ADS-B Out) functionality associated with the FAA's NextGen solution. Furthermore, I beleive countries like Japan have already mandated ADS-B technology. ADS-B takes GPS coordinates and speed of an aircraft and transmits them to ADS-B IN receivers, notably Air Traffic Control. Nextgen also implements ACARS, which has multiple reporting events that are more detailed like "out of the gate" and "on the ground". It would be fantastic if this system offers something that the aviation community needs, especially in light of MH370; however, it can't simply duplicate a federally mandated capability. No-one will buy it.

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