Japan Investigates Another 787 Battery Incident

AINsafety » January 20, 2014
January 20, 2014, 1:20 PM

The Japan Civil Aviation Bureau is investigating what caused smoke to pour from a main battery vent aboard a Japan Airlines Boeing 787 on January 14. The manufacturer developed a fix for its lithium batteries after last year’s fleet grounding, so the work now is focused on whether the fix actually worked and prevented a larger fire, or whether the smoke and the associated battery alarms were indicative of some other issue. As a precaution, Japan Airlines grounded the 787 involved in the incident.

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Roger
on January 21, 2014 - 2:28pm

Mind-boggling................

Only 20 minutes after this item was posted, the issue of transporting  Lithium batteries in civil aircraft [and the prohibition of their carriage in passenger aircraft] was raised on AIN............

Eight  4 volt, 65Ah cells with low cycle-efficiency and no provision for cooling sit midway between two large fan jets, each of which has elaborate cooling for  each turbine blade.................

These cells need individual cooling as much as  the turbine blades............

If a turbine blade melts, the engine is useless: If  a cell melts, the battery is useless...........any resulting fire and its containment is not the primary problem...........................

Substituting  15 Lead-acid-lithium sulfate cells for the 8 Li-ion would make the battery non-combustible while still being able to be called 'Lithium'.........................

[Aqueous sodium sulfate is a workable alternative to sulfuric acid in  lead cells; there appears to be no reason why aqueous lithium sulfate would not be as good]

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