Caiga Choses H85 Engine For Chinese Primus 150

AIN News Live » Airshow China » 2012
November 13, 2012, 8:53 AM

China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Co., Ltd. (Caiga) has chose GE Aviation’s new H85 turboprop engine to power its new Primus 150 aircraft. Set to be the first purpose-built executive single-engine turboprop built in China, the Primus 150 is a pressurized five-seater with an all-composite carbon-fiber airframe.

This will be the first application for the 850-shp H85, which is awaiting certification by the European Aviation Safety Agency. The engine is derived from GE’s existing H80 turboprop, which recently entered service on the Thrush 510G aircraft. It is expected to perform with 3.600 flight hours or 6,600 cycles between overhauls.

GE and Caiga have signed an agreement to jointly develop engine service and support capability for Primus 150 operators in China. “The H85-powered Primus 150 will allow GE to strengthen its presence in the region and to be a significant participant in China’s 12th five-year growth plan,” said GE Aviation business and general aviation vice president and general manager Brad Mottier.

The H85 engines will be manufactured at GE Aviation’s facility in the Czech Republic, which is currently ramping up production of the H80 engines. Along with the Thrush 510G agricultural aircraft, the H80 engine also has been selected to power the Aircraft Industries L410 commuter aircraft, which is expected to enter service early next year.

Caiga is a subsidiary of China’s Avic, which is part of the Comac group and it also owns Cirrus Aircraft, based in Duluth, Minn. At Airshow China Caiga announced sales of 60 Cirrus SR20 and SR22 aircraft to various customers in China. The deals bring the total number of Cirrus sales in China to date to more than 100, according to Paul Fiduccia, Cirrus Aircraft executive director for government affairs and international cooperation.

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