Aviation International News Monthly

Chad Trautvetter, October 1, 2014

Aerion’s long-awaited AS2 supersonic business jet (SSBJ) program received a major boost last month when Airbus signed up for a partnership involving an exchange of knowledge and capabilities in design, manufacturing and certification. According to Aerion, the collaboration will support the Mach 1.6, $100+ million AS2 through to certification. Although the industrialization plan for the new jet has still to be confirmed, the Reno, Nev.-based group said that this will happen “over the course of the next year” and confirmed that it is no longer searching for a manufacturing partner.

John Sheridan

On the heels of statements of dissatisfaction by senior U.S. Air Force officials about the current delay of more than two years in producing the critical Mission Data Unit (MDU) of the DOD’s future GPS III satellite program, the USAF issued a Sources Sought ultimatum to GPS III contractor Lockheed Martin and its subcontractor Excelis. Such a declaration–essentially advising the contractor to improve performance and indicating that the agency is investigating other sources for the work–was a bombshell event for the aerospace community.

Thierry Dubois

The rewrite of the EASA’s CS-23 and the FAA’ s Part 23 rules (known as the “CS/Part 23 Reorganization” initiative) is taking shape, and at a workshop last month in Brussels European authorities expressed unconditional support for the effort. Manufacturers of light aircraft (up to 12,500 pounds) are propelling this effort to establish more practical rules.

Click a heading below to see the stories in that channel.

Accidents
Robert P. Mark, October 6, 2014

Preliminary Report: AStar Substantially Damaged During Training

Airbus Helicopters AS350B3, Hemet, Calif., Aug. 28, 2014–The flight instructor and his student, both sheriff’s deputies, received minor injuries when their helicopter landed hard and rolled on its side during a late-morning VMC training flight. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department operated the Part 91 helicopter.

Robert P. Mark, October 1, 2014

It could have happened to any two professional pilots flying a nonprecision approach, in darkness, into weather that turned out to be worse than they expected after a night of back-side-of-the-clock flying. But the NTSB’s September 9 hearing into the Aug. 14, 2013 crash of UPS Flight 1354, an Airbus A300-600, on approach to Birmingham, Ala. (BHM), proved that even crews flying heavy jets can lose situational awareness and get just as far behind on nonprecision approach as King Air crews, especially when a handful of other factors also come into play.

Accidents, Safety, Security and Training
Mark Huber, October 2, 2014

The NTSB is faulting the pilot for the fatal air tour crash of a Blue Hawaiian Helicopters Airbus EC130B4 that went down in heavy rain and limited visibility on the island of Molokai on Nov. 10, 2011. The crash killed pilot Nathan Cline and his four passengers.

Aerospace Industry
Chad Trautvetter, October 1, 2014

Aerion’s long-awaited AS2 supersonic business jet (SSBJ) program received a major boost last month when Airbus signed up for a partnership involving an exchange of knowledge and capabilities in design, manufacturing and certification. According to Aerion, the collaboration will support the Mach 1.6, $100+ million AS2 through to certification. Although the industrialization plan for the new jet has still to be confirmed, the Reno, Nev.-based group said that this will happen “over the course of the next year” and confirmed that it is no longer searching for a manufacturing partner.

Air Transport and Cargo
Gregory Polek, October 4, 2014

Silver Airways chief financial officer Sami Teittinen replaced Dave Pflieger as the airline’s CEO as of September 5. The switch came after Pflieger accepted Hawaii Island Air’s chief executive position, held by Paul Casey until October 1. Casey has agreed to serve as a senior advisor for Island Air’s board of directors.

Mark Phelps, October 3, 2014

While greater safety in flight is always the trump card when it comes to weather radar performance, the core benefits of more modern systems can be measured in dollars and cents. Knowing early and with confidence precisely where heavy weather isn’t can save money by making dispatch and flight planning a lot more efficient and improving en route decision making for crews. That’s where Honeywell’s IntuVue 3-D weather system makes new and important inroads.

Jennifer Meszaros, October 3, 2014

Start-up carrier Cambodia Bayon Airlines in late August inked the largest-ever international contract for Xi’an Aircraft MA-60 turbopropsafter reaching terms on a deal with state-controlled aerospace conglomerate Aviation Industry Corporation of China (Avic). Valued at $450 million at list prices, the contract includes a firm order for two MA-60s and a letter of intent for 18 more over five years. Avic has received commitments for some 270 MA-60s, almost 100 of which it has delivered.

Airports
Curt Epstein, October 7, 2014

The Pitkin County (Colo.) attorney’s office has accepted Landmark Aviation’s submission of an application to open a second FBO at Aspen/Pitkin County Airport, thus triggering the mandatory issuance of a request for proposals (RFP). In 2012, the county-approved master plan examined the possibility of another service provider at the airport, which is currently served by Atlantic Aviation.

Curt Epstein, October 7, 2014

The three locations of Sacramento Jet Center (SACjet) are the most recent additions to the UVair FBO Network, a joint venture between Universal Aviation & Weather and fuel supplier Epic Aviation. Late last year, SACjet took over operation of the sole FBO at county-owned Mather Field, with its 11,300-foot main runway. The facility was previously operated by Atlantic Aviation, dating back to its 2006 merger with Trajen Flight Support.

Curt Epstein, October 7, 2014

Miami, Fla.-based World Fuel Services has added the Orion Jet Center at nearby Opa-Locka Executive Airport to its preferred network of FBOs. The Ascent-branded facility offers business aviation clientele fuel, hangar storage, pilot lounge, flight-planning facilities, on-site U.S. Customs, rental cars, 24-hour gourmet catering and preferred hotel arrangements. Opa-Locka is less than a 30-minute drive from downtown Miami, South Beach, Bal Harbor and Fort Lauderdale.

Curt Epstein, October 7, 2014

International Corporate and Cargo Services (ICCS), an FBO based in Mexico City, opened its latest location at Mariano Matamoros International Airport in Cuernavaca, in the south central part of the country. The FBO is open during airport hours (7 a.m. to 7 p.m.), with after-hours callout available, and offers a 12,260-sq-ft terminal, the largest among the ICCS facilities, with a passenger lounge, a pilot lounge, flight-planning room, ground transportation, hotel reservation service and catering. A pilot sleep room is under construction.

Curt Epstein, October 8, 2014

After a several-month delay in the issuance of its certificate of occupancy–a result of insufficient phone lines for the facility’s fire alarm–the newest heliport in the U.S. opened in the Dallas suburb of Desoto at the end of August. The $5 million, 19-acre facility is jointly owned by the Texas Department of Transportation, the city of DeSoto and the DeSoto Economic Development Corp.

Curt Epstein, October 8, 2014

Ann Arbor, Mich.-based fuel supplier Avfuel has added five locations to its domestic U.S. network. Astin Aviation is the lone service provider at Easterwood Field Airport in College Station, Texas, adjacent to Texas A&M University and the George Bush Presidential Library, and the location is offering triple Avtrip points on qualifying purchases through the end of November.

Kim Rosenlof, October 4, 2014

Pilots flying into Boise Airport (KBOI) in southwestern Idaho might want to listen to ground taxi instructions carefully during the next 12 to 18 months as the busiest airport for more than 300 miles in any direction continues its runway resurfacing and taxiway realignment projects.

ATC
John Sheridan, October 1, 2014

On the heels of statements of dissatisfaction by senior U.S. Air Force officials about the current delay of more than two years in producing the critical Mission Data Unit (MDU) of the DOD’s future GPS III satellite program, the USAF issued a Sources Sought ultimatum to GPS III contractor Lockheed Martin and its subcontractor Excelis. Such a declaration–essentially advising the contractor to improve performance and indicating that the agency is investigating other sources for the work–was a bombshell event for the aerospace community.

Avionics
Matt Thurber, October 7, 2014

Ruag Aviation signed a dealership agreement with Jetcraft to market the HUD Vision Access for the Challenger 604 and 605. Under the agreement, Ruag will sell and install the enhanced flight vision system (EFVS), which includes an Elbit AT-HUD head-up display and infrared sensor. The HUD Vision Access also allows pilots to descend below decision height at many airports (generally 100 feet lower for ILS and LPV GPS approaches with vertical guidance) thanks to FAA landing credits for an approved EFVS, which displays the infrared EVS image on the HUD.

Matt Thurber, October 7, 2014

The FAA has issued Avionics & Systems Integration Group (ASIG) an amendment to the Part 25 approved model list (AML) STC for its flyTab Class 2 iPad EFB installation, adding the Bombardier Dash 8-100/200/300 and Q400 to the STC. The AML STC is available for both U.S. and Canadian operators of the types covered by the STC. ASIG’s eXtreme Flight Bag (XFB) system adds more rugged components to the mounting system for iPads in cockpits.

Matt Thurber, October 7, 2014

Operators that need to meet upcoming ADS-B OUT mandates have an option for a precision GPS source, the Esterline CMC Electronics IntegriFlight CMA-5024 Landing System Sensor. The CMA-5024 not only meets the ADS-B OUT GPS sensor requirements but also offers the optional CMA-5025 control panel so the unit can act as a completely independent precision approach system. The CMA-5024 offers RNP 0.1 performance and built-in LPV approach capability to CAT I standards, “with growth to GBAS CAT I/II/III, according to CMC. The unit also meets all TSO C-145c Beta-3 and TSO C-146c Delta-4 requirements.

Mark Phelps, October 3, 2014

While greater safety in flight is always the trump card when it comes to weather radar performance, the core benefits of more modern systems can be measured in dollars and cents. Knowing early and with confidence precisely where heavy weather isn’t can save money by making dispatch and flight planning a lot more efficient and improving en route decision making for crews. That’s where Honeywell’s IntuVue 3-D weather system makes new and important inroads.

Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

The issue of FAA delays in approving letters of authorization (LOAs) for operations such as RVSM continues to fester. At this month’s NBAA Convention, the FAA’s Roger Sultan will join attorney David Norton of Shackelford, Melton, McKinley & Norton to help pilots and aircraft operators understand the LOA process, learn how recent changes might accelerate LOA approvals and give feedback about their experiences obtaining LOAs.

Matt Thurber, October 7, 2014

For aircraft equipped with satcom or air-to-ground Internet connectivity, pilots can use an iPhone/iPad app from Aerovie while airborne to submit pilot reports directly to the FAA’s Aviation Weather Center and to Lockheed Martin Flight Services (the contractor that runs the FAA’s network of flight service stations). The AerovieReports app also delivers Pireps directly to the app, saving pilots time looking up flight service frequencies and calling on the radio for updated information.

Business Aviation
Curt Epstein, October 2, 2014

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the entry into service for one of business aviation’s most enigmatic aircraft, the star-crossed Beech Starship, which was intended as a replacement for the King Air. As the first aircraft with an all-composite fuselage, the twin-turboprop pusher with radical canard forward design underwent a lengthy development and certification process before finally entering service.

Chad Trautvetter, October 1, 2014

Aerion’s long-awaited AS2 supersonic business jet (SSBJ) program received a major boost last month when Airbus signed up for a partnership involving an exchange of knowledge and capabilities in design, manufacturing and certification. According to Aerion, the collaboration will support the Mach 1.6, $100+ million AS2 through to certification. Although the industrialization plan for the new jet has still to be confirmed, the Reno, Nev.-based group said that this will happen “over the course of the next year” and confirmed that it is no longer searching for a manufacturing partner.

Nigel Moll, October 1, 2014

Jet Engines

Among manufacturers of turbofans for business aircraft, Williams retains the number-one slot in product support but is not alone at the top this year, sharing the honors with Rolls-Royce, which moves up from the number-three slot it held last year.

Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

At last year’s NBAA show, whatever good news could be unearthed about business aviation was dampened by the dismal impact of the government sequestration, effects of which are still evident. While the political machinations emanating from Washington, D.C., this year seem to have abated somewhat, there is still a threat of a government shutdown, but so far, at least, there have been no big eruptions of user fee proposals to mar this year’s show. Attacks on business aviation seem to have abated, too, perhaps because the government has more important items on its agenda.

Robert P. Mark, October 4, 2014

Twenty-five years ago, aviation department manager jobs were often automatically awarded to the most senior pilot, or the person considered the best “stick and rudder” aviator. That kind of career advancement began changing as we entered the 21st century. The efforts to create smarter managers took off in earnest when aviation leaders found themselves under increased scrutiny from regulators, shareholders and investors about how they used their aircraft after the downturn of 2008 and the resulting bad press for private aviation.

Business Aviation Aircraft
Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

There had to be a way of delivering the latest in business jet technology without doing a clean-sheet design,” said Jay Heublein, executive v-p of global sales and marketing for Nextant Aerospace, explaining the reasoning behind the Nextant 400XTi remanufacturing of the Beechjet 400/Hawker 400XP.

Mark Huber, October 2, 2014

Think less James Bond, more Captain Value.

New business jets under development have one thing in common: with a laser-like focus on value, almost to the model they have achieved a near-perfect balance of versatility, performance, comfort and costs.

Concern about costs per seat mile used to be the preserve of the airlines. No longer: it has helped define even the Mach 0.935 Cessna Citation X+.

Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

I pulled the Eclipse 550’s throttles back and allowed the jet to slow down. The autopilot and autothrottles were turned off, but as we neared the stall, an audio alert sounded (“STALL”), the autothrottles kicked in and automatically advanced power to maximum continuous thrust and the airspeed climbed back to a safe level as I simultaneously unloaded the wings. After leveling off, I reset the throttles and resumed normal cruise speed.

Cabin Interior and Electronics
James Wynbrandt, October 3, 2014

 

James Wynbrandt, October 5, 2014

Two years after selling a majority stake to investment firm Graycliff Partners of New York City, Skandia, which provides seating materials, flammability testing and other interiors products and services to the business aviation industry, is in expansion mode. “We’re looking to grow,” said Jarod Triplett, v-p of the Dawson Junction, Ill.-based company. “I can see us doubling in size over the next five years, with some targeted market recovery as well as the [addition] of some new product lines and services to our portfolio.”

FBOs
Ian Sheppard, October 4, 2014

Opened three years ago at a cost of $48 million, the Rizon Jet FBO at London Biggin Hill Airport is now the company’s only facility, following closure of its Doha location earlier this year after Doha’s new international airport opened. Rizon Jet has thus focused even more effort on upping the standard at what is still a relatively quiet and uncongested airport.

Financing, Insurance and Taxes
Chad Trautvetter, October 7, 2014

Despite an estimated $535 million overage in aviation insurance claims this year stemming from a recent spate of foreign airline losses–including two fatal crashes involving Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777s and a rebel attack at Libya’s Tripoli International Airport that damaged 20 airplanes–Corporate Aviation Insurance Group president Matt Drummelsmith doesn’t expect any effect on insurance premiums for U.S.-based aircraft operators.

Fuel
Curt Epstein, October 5, 2014

With fuel representing the lion’s share of a business aircraft’s operating costs–up to 70 percent according to some calculations–reducing the cost of fuel purchases remains one of the most salient ways for an operator to save money. With today’s more efficient, longer-range aircraft, operators can take advantage of differences in regional fuel pricing more often by topping off their tanks where fuel is cheaper, to the extent that increased burn penalty allows.

Government
Gordon Gilbert, October 3, 2014

Within Six Months

Oct. 14, 2014

NTSB Proposes Changes to Investigation Procedures

Maintenance and Modifications
David A. Lombardo, October 4, 2014

Peterborough, Ontario-based Flying Colours is a privately owned and operated aviation services company. The 25-year-old MRO specializes in maintenance, repair and overhaul services, completions and modification services for business aircraft. In 2009 Flying Colours acquired JetCorp, located on Spirit of St. Louis Airport (KSUS) in St.

Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

There had to be a way of delivering the latest in business jet technology without doing a clean-sheet design,” said Jay Heublein, executive v-p of global sales and marketing for Nextant Aerospace, explaining the reasoning behind the Nextant 400XTi remanufacturing of the Beechjet 400/Hawker 400XP.

Mark Huber, October 5, 2014

The maintenance and logistics behind keeping big helicopters such as the tandem-rotor Columbia Helicopters 234 and the Erickson Aviation S-64 Air Crane flying can seem downright daunting.

James Wynbrandt, October 4, 2014

Sabreliner Aviation, rooted in support of Sabreliner business jets, plans to expand its business aviation MRO services in the wake of its purchase and reorganization earlier this year. “We’re not a start-up, but an upstart,” said Sabreliner Services president Greg Fedele at the company’s headquarters in Perryville, Mo., explaining the company’s reinvention.

Regional Airlines
Gregory Polek, October 4, 2014

American Airlines plans to transfer all 47 of Envoy Air’s Bombardier CRJ700s to fellow wholly owned regional subsidiary PSA starting in the middle of next year, Envoy CEO Pedro Fábregas reported in a September 4 letter to employees posted on the Dallas Morning News website. Although the major airline hasn’t yet determined the exact dates and the rates at which it will transfer the 70-seat jets, it anticipates it will complete the exercise by the end of 2016.

Gregory Polek, October 4, 2014

Bombardier delivered the first Q400 in a new extra-capacity seating configuration to Thailand’s Nok Air, the companies announced in late August. The milestone 86-seat aircraft arrived in Bangkok under the terms of a purchase agreement signed in November last year for up to eight Q400s. The airline now holds firm orders for six of the big turboprops and retains purchase rights on another two.

Regulations and Government
John Sheridan, October 1, 2014

On the heels of statements of dissatisfaction by senior U.S. Air Force officials about the current delay of more than two years in producing the critical Mission Data Unit (MDU) of the DOD’s future GPS III satellite program, the USAF issued a Sources Sought ultimatum to GPS III contractor Lockheed Martin and its subcontractor Excelis. Such a declaration–essentially advising the contractor to improve performance and indicating that the agency is investigating other sources for the work–was a bombshell event for the aerospace community.

Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

The issue of FAA delays in approving letters of authorization (LOAs) for operations such as RVSM continues to fester. At this month’s NBAA Convention, the FAA’s Roger Sultan will join attorney David Norton of Shackelford, Melton, McKinley & Norton to help pilots and aircraft operators understand the LOA process, learn how recent changes might accelerate LOA approvals and give feedback about their experiences obtaining LOAs.

Thierry Dubois, October 1, 2014

The rewrite of the EASA’s CS-23 and the FAA’ s Part 23 rules (known as the “CS/Part 23 Reorganization” initiative) is taking shape, and at a workshop last month in Brussels European authorities expressed unconditional support for the effort. Manufacturers of light aircraft (up to 12,500 pounds) are propelling this effort to establish more practical rules.

Rotorcraft
Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014

Greg Maitlen pivoted the Bell 407GX carefully as we approached a ridge slightly lower than nearby 10,064-foot Mount San Antonio (also known as Mount Baldy), the highest peak in southern California’s tinder-dry San Gabriel mountain range. Maitlen, Bell Helicopter’s regional sales manager for the mountain U.S., was piloting a demo of the 407GX’s new flight manual supplement allowing carriage of a heavier payload in hot-and-high conditions. The new AFM supplement was certified in July and involves no changes to the 407GX other than placing the new FMS-12 supplement in the helicopter.

Mark Huber, October 5, 2014

The maintenance and logistics behind keeping big helicopters such as the tandem-rotor Columbia Helicopters 234 and the Erickson Aviation S-64 Air Crane flying can seem downright daunting.

Mark Huber, October 6, 2014

If you’ve frequented major American airshows in the last 25 years, chances are you’ve seen Otto The Helicopter, a 1985 Schweizer 300 with its canopy done over in clown face. Roger Buis is Otto’s second pilot; he and his wife Pauline bought the act in 1999.

Mark Huber, October 2, 2014

The NTSB is faulting the pilot for the fatal air tour crash of a Blue Hawaiian Helicopters Airbus EC130B4 that went down in heavy rain and limited visibility on the island of Molokai on Nov. 10, 2011. The crash killed pilot Nathan Cline and his four passengers.

Rotorcraft Aircraft
Thierry Dubois, October 8, 2014

Russian Helicopters has announced major investments in its factories. Kazan Helicopters has inaugurated a $13 million painting and finishing workshop. In Perm, Reductor-PM has started building a new gearbox and transmission assembly and testing facility. Russian Helicopters, which held a 796-aircraft backlog as of June 30, invested $220 million in production capacity last year.

Thierry Dubois, October 8, 2014

The FAA has certified the V400 avionics software for the S-76D, allowing single-pilot IFR operations. The system adds LPV capability for satellite-aided approaches and allows SiriusXM weather to be overlaid on to a moving map. ADS-B data can be transmitted via the mode-S transponder.

Thierry Dubois, October 8, 2014

Four Russian pilots took off last month from Moscow in a pair of Robinson R66 turbine singles for a 30,000-nm round-trip to New Zealand taking them over Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia and various Pacific islands en route followed by a return flight that transits through Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Cyprus, Turkey and Ukraine. The pilots anticipate making 85 takeoffs and landings at 78 airports.

Mark Huber, October 5, 2014

AgustaWestland could fly a larger “next-generation civil tiltrotor” (NGCTR) by 2020. Propelled by internal company studies and research that began in 2000, the larger tiltrotor project is now being pushed to the next level with $328 million in new funding from the Industry/European Union’s CleanSky2 initiative.

Thierry Dubois, October 6, 2014

The Step Change in Safety organization, which represents a number of players in the North Sea oil-and-gas industry, is reporting progress in the implementation of the safety improvement measures required by the UK CAA in its CAP 1145 review. To improve survivability in the event of a ditching, helicopters are being equipped with a better emergency breathing system (EBS) and more attention is being focused on the shape and size of passengers in relation to the size of emergency escape windows.

Thierry Dubois, October 6, 2014

Ostend, Belgium-based helicopter operator NHV is to take over Norway’s Blueway, the two firms announced in late August. The new company, which has not yet indicated whether it will adopt a new name–has set its sights on establishing itself as a major player in the offshore oil-and-gas market.

Mark Huber, October 7, 2014

AgustaWestland is preparing to make a big splash in the executive helicopter market when deliveries of its new AW169 medium twin begin next year. The company already claims a 65-percent world market share in recent years for twins with VIP and executive interiors and it is counting on the new helicopter to add to it.

Safety
Matt Thurber, October 4, 2014

An innovation in personal computer-based flight simulation–a shared cockpit between two people flying their simulators in separate locations–is now available on the X-Plane simulator running the PilotEdge live ATC system. PilotEdge allows simulator fliers to interact with live controllers when flying in the southern California region.

Mark Phelps, October 3, 2014

While greater safety in flight is always the trump card when it comes to weather radar performance, the core benefits of more modern systems can be measured in dollars and cents. Knowing early and with confidence precisely where heavy weather isn’t can save money by making dispatch and flight planning a lot more efficient and improving en route decision making for crews. That’s where Honeywell’s IntuVue 3-D weather system makes new and important inroads.

Robert P. Mark, October 1, 2014

It could have happened to any two professional pilots flying a nonprecision approach, in darkness, into weather that turned out to be worse than they expected after a night of back-side-of-the-clock flying. But the NTSB’s September 9 hearing into the Aug. 14, 2013 crash of UPS Flight 1354, an Airbus A300-600, on approach to Birmingham, Ala. (BHM), proved that even crews flying heavy jets can lose situational awareness and get just as far behind on nonprecision approach as King Air crews, especially when a handful of other factors also come into play.

Thierry Dubois, October 6, 2014

The Step Change in Safety organization, which represents a number of players in the North Sea oil-and-gas industry, is reporting progress in the implementation of the safety improvement measures required by the UK CAA in its CAP 1145 review. To improve survivability in the event of a ditching, helicopters are being equipped with a better emergency breathing system (EBS) and more attention is being focused on the shape and size of passengers in relation to the size of emergency escape windows.

Security
Matt Thurber, October 4, 2014

Satellite communications systems have security vulnerabilities that may allow hackers to gain access to aircraft systems, according to cyber security expert Ruben Santamarta, principal security consultant at IOActive Security Services, speaking at the Black Hat USA conference early last month. Santamarta and IOActive published a white paper that discusses security vulnerabilities in air, sea and land satcom systems, including systems made by Cobham (formerly Thrane & Thrane) and Iridium.

Training
Ian Sheppard, October 2, 2014

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has made it possible for private pilots to obtain a full European instrument rating in an alternative, flexible, “competency-based modular” way. In addition to a private pilot license, a candidate can use a UK IMC rating or an overseas (FAA, for example) instrument rating as the basis, along with experience logged flying in IMC or under instrument flight rules.

Mark Phelps, October 7, 2014

Lee Lauderback conducts upset training in a comprehensive program designed specifically for jet pilots. Best known for his warbird training and support company, Stallion 51 in Kissimmee, Fla., Lauderback decided a few years ago that crews of corporate jets with glass panels ought to train in something similar to what they fly for a living. As a veteran corporate jet pilot himself (former chief pilot for Arnold Palmer), Lauderback established his unusual-attitude training program branded as UAT. The logo even has a stylized “A” printed upside down.

October 2014

This Month's Top Stories

Business Aviation

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the entry into service for one of business aviation’s most enigmatic aircraft, the star-crossed Beech Starship, which was intended as a replacement for the King Air. As the first aircraft with an all-composite fuselage, the twin-turboprop pusher with radical canard forward design underwent a lengthy development and certification process before finally entering service.

Business Aviation

Jet Engines

Among manufacturers of turbofans for business aircraft, Williams retains the number-one slot in product support but is not alone at the top this year, sharing the honors with Rolls-Royce, which moves up from the number-three slot it held last year.

Safety

It could have happened to any two professional pilots flying a nonprecision approach, in darkness, into weather that turned out to be worse than they expected after a night of back-side-of-the-clock flying. But the NTSB’s September 9 hearing into the Aug. 14, 2013 crash of UPS Flight 1354, an Airbus A300-600, on approach to Birmingham, Ala. (BHM), proved that even crews flying heavy jets can lose situational awareness and get just as far behind on nonprecision approach as King Air crews, especially when a handful of other factors also come into play.

Business Aviation Aircraft

I pulled the Eclipse 550’s throttles back and allowed the jet to slow down. The autopilot and autothrottles were turned off, but as we neared the stall, an audio alert sounded (“STALL”), the autothrottles kicked in and automatically advanced power to maximum continuous thrust and the airspeed climbed back to a safe level as I simultaneously unloaded the wings. After leveling off, I reset the throttles and resumed normal cruise speed.

This Month's Most Popular

Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014
Jennifer Meszaros, October 3, 2014
Matt Thurber, October 1, 2014
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