Business Aviation » Business Aviation Engines

News and issues relating to business aircraft turbine engines.

October 30, 2012 - 10:20am
GE Passport 20 engine

GE Aviation (Booth No. 3900) is planning on testing the first full Passport 20 engine, slated to power the Bombardier Global 7000 and 8000, in the second quarter of next year. The design of the 16,500-pound-thrust turbofan was frozen in April this year. A series of thorough safety trials is well under way.

October 30, 2012 - 9:10am
Honeywell HTF7500E

Honeywell is targeting the third quarter of next year for the certification of the HTF7500E turbofan. This is a revised schedule that fits with Embraer’s delay in developing the midlight Legacy 450 and midsize Legacy 500 business jets.

October 29, 2012 - 8:10pm

Safran USA (Booth No. 2579) is flexing some considerable muscle here at the convention, showing a diverse role in the business aircraft market that stretches from nose to tail and wingtip to wingtip. Among the aviation products available from this global conglomerate are turbofan engines, nacelles, thrust reversers, landing gear, wheels and brakes, auxiliary power units, avionics, navigation systems, flight controls and wiring.

October 29, 2012 - 4:50pm
PT6A-140

Pratt & Whitney Canada is here with the recently certified PT6A-140, the latest version of a turboprop engine that will celebrate next year the 50th anniversary of its first delivery. The -140 is will power Cessna’s new Grand Caravan EX turboprop single, with 867 shp at takeoff. That represents a 28-percent increase over the -114A used in the Grand Caravan. Transport Canada certified the -140 last July. The FAA’s equivalent approval is expected “in the next few months,” according to Denis Parisien, P&WC vice president for general aviation.

October 29, 2012 - 10:45am
GE Honda HF120

GE Honda Aero completed water-ingestion testing on the HF120 engine that powers Honda Aircraft’s HondaJet in early September. The tests were done in one of GE’s Peebles, Ohio test cells and are just one of many the HF 120 has passed during a busy year as the engine nears FAA certification.

October 16, 2012 - 4:01pm

GE Honda Aero Engines completed water-ingestion testing last week on the HF120 engine that powers Honda Aircraft’s HondaJet. The tests were done in one of GE’s Peebles, Ohio test cells.

“2012 has been an extremely productive year,” said GE Honda Aero president Terry Sharp. The HF120 passed the ice slab test in August 2011 after failing it in February 2011, due to fan blade tip deformation causing a reduction in required thrust, according to executive v-p Masahiko Izumi. “We decided to make a small design change” to the fan blade tips, he said.

October 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

The GE Aviation H80 turboprop engine recently received type certification from the Interstate Aviation Committee Aviation Register (IAC AR). The Russian agency issued the approval on September 24. To date, the 800-shp H80 engine has obtained type certification from the EASA, FAA, Brazil’s ANAC and the Argentine Administración Nacional de Aviación Civil. GE is pursuing type certificates for the H80 in other countries, including Canada and China.

October 3, 2012 - 8:30am

GE Aviation is currently gathering hardware for the assembly of the first Passport engine for the Bombardier Global 7000 and 8000 program. Assembly of the first full engine will begin by year end, according to Brad Mottier, vice president and general manager of GE Aviation’s Business and General Aviation organization.

October 1, 2012 - 9:00am

General Electric and Rolls-Royce tie for first place among turbofan manufacturers, each scoring an overall average of 8.0 for the quality of product support they provide their customers. Compared with last year, that score represented an improvement of 5 percent for GE and 1 percent for R-R.

July 31, 2012 - 2:59pm

GE Aviation launched two derivatives of its recently certified 800-shp H80 turboprop engine–the 750-shp H75 and 850-shp H85. Like the H80, the H75 and H85 will be aimed at the agricultural, commuter, utility and business turboprop segments. EASA and FAA certification of the derivative engines is expected early next year. The H75 and H85 will be certified and manufactured at GE Aviation’s facility in the Czech Republic, where production of the H80 is already under way.

 
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