Raytheon Special Mission Aircraft Skills Ideal For MENA Region

Dubai Air Show » 2011
ISR aircraft
Raytheon was for prime contractor the RAF’s King Air-based Shadow (left) and Global Express-based Sentinel (right) ISR platforms.
November 13, 2011, 8:53 AM

Raytheon has come to Dubai to press the case for its special-mission aircraft expertise in a region where the U.S. company sees a healthy market for airborne ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance). It can supply a wide range of sensors from its own stable, such as the AVES EO/IR system and SeaVue radar for maritime applications, but also has the capability to fully integrate mission equipment from other manufacturers.

The U.S. company’s portfolio includes datalinks and satcoms, exploitation systems and the ability to pull together expertise from across the company to build C4I infrastructures. The organic ability to provide mission equipment has been enhanced by the recent acquisition of Applied Signals Technology, which specializes in signals intelligence.

Although Raytheon’s technology is platform-agnostic, the most common special-mission aircraft is Hawker Beechcraft’s King Air. Raytheon (Stand E350) acted as prime contractor for the provision of four ISR-equipped King Air 350s to the UK’s Royal Air Force. Known in service as the “Shadow,” the King Airs were procured under an urgent operational requirement. Last month they were transferred to the RAF’s No. 14 Squadron, having been part of No. 5 Squadron.

Raytheon was also the prime on No. 5 Squadron’s Sentinel aircraft, based on the Bombardier Global Express business jet and featuring a Raytheon dual-mode radar for SAR/GMTI. Raytheon’s director for international business development in the ISR field, Bob Bushnell, sees a good market for this class of platform. “From up at 45,000 feet,” he said, “you can see a long way, and remove a lot of the problems you get with mountains blocking the view.”

The company is already a major supplier of sensors and systems to the Predator, Reaper and Global Hawk and there are also growing opportunities in the unmanned market.

Raytheon is now actively pursuing a number of contracts in the Middle East and North America for sensors and radars, and is also seeking to export signals intelligence systems. The company is hoping that its end-to-end capability and long experience in the ISR field will be decisive.  “We have proven programs, and happy customers,” said Bushnell. “Our programs stand on their own merit.”Raytheon has come to Dubai to press the case for its special-mission aircraft expertise in a region where the U.S. company sees a healthy market for airborne ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance). It can supply a wide range of sensors from its own stable, such as the AVES EO/IR system and SeaVue radar for maritime applications, but also has the capability to fully integrate mission equipment from other manufacturers.

The U.S. company’s portfolio includes datalinks and satcoms, exploitation systems and the ability to pull together expertise from across the company to build C4I infrastructures. The organic ability to provide mission equipment has been enhanced by the recent acquisition of Applied Signals Technology, which specializes in signals intelligence.

Although Raytheon’s technology is platform-agnostic, the most common special-mission aircraft is Hawker Beechcraft’s King Air. Raytheon (Stand E350) acted as prime contractor for the provision of four ISR-equipped King Air 350s to the UK’s Royal Air Force. Known in service as the “Shadow,” the King Airs were procured under an urgent operational requirement. Last month they were transferred to the RAF’s No. 14 Squadron, having been part of No. 5 Squadron.

Raytheon was also the prime on No. 5 Squadron’s Sentinel aircraft, based on the Bombardier Global Express business jet and featuring a Raytheon dual-mode radar for SAR/GMTI. Raytheon’s director for international business development in the ISR field, Bob Bushnell, sees a good market for this class of platform. “From up at 45,000 feet,” he said, “you can see a long way, and remove a lot of the problems you get with mountains blocking the view.”

The company is already a major supplier of sensors and systems to the Predator, Reaper and Global Hawk and there are also growing opportunities in the unmanned market.

Raytheon is now actively pursuing a number of contracts in the Middle East and North America for sensors and radars, and is also seeking to export signals intelligence systems. The company is hoping that its end-to-end capability and long experience in the ISR field will be decisive.  “We have proven programs, and happy customers,” said Bushnell. “Our programs stand on their own merit.”

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