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October 8, 2007 - 8:03am

Gulfstream was able to make the first two flights of its GV-SP prototype for a total of five hours before all aircraft operations in the U.S. were brought to a sudden stop for several days, following last month’s terrorist atrocities. The ultra-long-range GV-SP prototype made its first flight August 31, several weeks ahead of its originally announced schedule. Certification of the GV-SP is scheduled for the fourth quarter next year.

October 8, 2007 - 8:02am

Some charter companies are reporting new interest and bookings as a result of last month’s terrorist attacks. Demand is reportedly up in response to more time-consuming airline check-in security requirements, as well as the perception that charter will provide better security. One wire story said a charter service in Southern California reported a 110-percent increase in customer calls.

October 8, 2007 - 8:01am

Boeing Business Jet officials in Seattle were uncertain at press time how the BBJ program would be affected by the planned layoffs of between 20,000 and 30,000 Boeing employees by the end of next year. The decision comes amid an actual and expected drop in orders for Boeing airliners as a result of last month’s terrorist attacks. Deliveries of airliners this year, which Boeing had expected to be 538 aircraft, could be as low as 500.

October 8, 2007 - 8:00am

Thomas McSweeny is delaying his planned departure from the FAA at the request of the agency. McSweeny agreed to continue serving as associate administrator for regulation and certification through at least this month. He is preparing to join Boeing as director of international safety and regulatory affairs (see page 24).

October 8, 2007 - 7:59am

NBAA will not host social events, including the safety awards banquet at the association’s rescheduled convention. New security procedures will be in place for attendees and exhibitors. Aviation, business and government leaders will present a plenary session to address the current state of business aviation.

October 8, 2007 - 7:58am

At a meeting on September 20, the NBAA board of directors decided to  re-schedule the association’s 54th annual convention and trade show for December 12 to 14 in New Orleans. The association’s annual meeting of members has been scheduled for October 31 in Washington. The annual convention and meeting was originally scheduled for September 18 to 20 in New Orleans, but was canceled following the terrorist attacks of September 11.

October 8, 2007 - 7:52am

When terrorists plunged their hijacked airliners into the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center and the Pentagon last month, it had an immediate effect on business aircraft owners and operators, and will likely have a profound influence for years to come.

October 8, 2007 - 7:47am

In the wake of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington on September 11, the NBAA canceled its 54th annual convention in New Orleans last month “to redirect the association’s resources toward national recovery and aid to the victims and their families,” president Jack Olcott said in a statement issued on September 12. This is the first time in its history that NBAA has had to cancel an annual convention.

October 8, 2007 - 7:44am
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The tragedy of September 11, 2001, began with what is arguably the most far-reaching aviation event since the Enola Gay released its burden over Hiroshima. That moment, 56 years ago, defined the onset of a new era, an age overshadowed by the specter of global thermonuclear war, and life was never the same.

October 8, 2007 - 6:49am

They called them “libbers” back in 1973. Any women who presumed to take on a profession normally associated with males were generally assumed to be radical members of the then-new “women’s liberation” movement. Kathy Kusner was one of them. She was the first woman to fly for Executive Jet Aviation, one of the largest charter operators in the country at that time.

 
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