Aviation International News » February 2003

January 11, 2008 - 9:45am

Whether or not Cirrus Design of Duluth, Minn., ever decides to build a single-engine personal jet depends heavily on what emerges on the small-turbofan development front. Cirrus director of marketing Ian Bentley told AIN, “Throughout aviation history, starting with the Wright brothers, airframe development has relied on the emergence of new engines.”

January 11, 2008 - 9:33am

The rejected takeoff of a Boeing 777 at approximately 160 knots results in the landing gear absorbing more than one billion joules of energy in a few seconds, according to research recently done by Messier-Bugatti. To put this number in perspective, consider it as the equivalent of supplying energy to the average house (lamps, outdoor lights, refrigerator, television, computer and other appliances) for about 18 hours.

January 11, 2008 - 9:16am

Suppose your aviation medical examiner (AME) gives you the little piece of paper that proclaims to the FAA that you are fit to fly, but the paperwork never reaches the agency’s Aeromedical Certification Branch in Oklahoma City. Are you legal? Are you liable? While certainly not routine, the situation has cropped up more often than one might think.

January 11, 2008 - 9:10am

“One of the myths about the impact of automation on human performance is that as the investment in automation increases, the investment needed in human expertise decreases. In fact, increased automation creates new knowledge and skill requirements.”        
–Dr. David Woods
Professor, Ohio State University;
technical advisor for FAA human-factors report

January 11, 2008 - 8:58am

Dassault Falcon Jet’s recent appointments of John Rahilly and Todd McGahey mark the latest efforts by the manufacturer to market the customer-support offerings at its two company-owned service centers in Little Rock, Ark., and Wilmington, Del.

January 11, 2008 - 8:54am

After eight months on the job as president of Pratt & Whitney Canada, Alain Bellemare guides a company that is becoming increasingly global in nature while it capitalizes on the technology embodied in its current turbine engines. Former P&WC president Gilles Ouimet has been elevated to chairman, where he steers the high-level strategic direction of the company.

January 11, 2008 - 8:49am

Like many an infant, aviation entered the world tentatively when the Wright Brothers coaxed a manned, heavier-than-air powered flying machine off the ground. Flight in America after the Wrights’ achievement was marked more by squabbling over patents than by rapid advances in the science, and the Europeans, particularly the French, seized on the new sport keenly.

January 11, 2008 - 8:25am

The total number of U.S.-registered turbine airplanes involved in serious accidents last year decreased significantly from 2001, a year that saw business aviation accidents increase over 2000. Last year there were 41 nonfatal accidents, 19 fatal accidents and 47 fatalities compared with 44 nonfatal accidents and 24 fatal accidents that killed 80 passengers and crew in 2001, according to safety analyst Robert E.

January 11, 2008 - 8:19am

The Transportation Security Administration’s revised final Private Charter Standard Security Program (PCSSP) released on New Year’s Eve removes the Global Express from inclusion in passenger and baggage screening requirements. At the same time, the revised program adds a minimum seating configuration that expands coverage to aircraft that wouldn’t have been covered solely under a weight determination.

January 11, 2008 - 8:13am

An international training course is now offered monthly by Arinc Direct at its Annapolis, Md. headquarters. The one-day course, which costs $525 per person, is an expansion of the program Arinc has been offering regularly to the flight departments of Coca-Cola, Dreamworks, Ford, IBM, and TAG Aviation. Arinc said the course meets Part 91 and 135 requirements for international operations, including RVSM and MNPS.

 
X