Aviation International News » January 2007

December 18, 2006 - 5:41am
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You are sitting in a diner, sipping your fourth cup of coffee, solving aviation’s problems with an old friend, when the idea comes to you in a caffeinated burst of inspiration: a new jet, one that will fill a niche no manufacturer has yet tackled, with safety features, performance, efficiency and comfort that will open new markets and sell like hot cakes around the globe.

December 18, 2006 - 5:26am

Engine manufacturers are showing renewed interest in the 10,000-pound-thrust segment. They see the aging of the General Electric (GE) CF34-3B, the only engine in production in the class, and at least two companies–Snecma and Pratt & Whitney Canada–are eyeing future large business jets, the size of the Bombardier Challenger 600 series, as potential applications. Meanwhile, GE is modernizing the CF34-1 for the Challenger 601.

December 18, 2006 - 5:21am

NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia is addressing runway and taxiway incursion threats by testing a variety of new technologies, one of the most interesting of which is a miniature head-up display that the pilot wears on his head and positions in front of the eye.

December 18, 2006 - 5:14am

Chelton Flight Systems and Kollsman are one step closer to introducing technology that can integrate the display symbology from Chelton’s FlightLogic EFIS with the infrared video image of Kollsman’s GAViS (general aviation vision system), a forward-looking camera that holds the promise of giving pilots a new way of seeing the world ahead.

December 18, 2006 - 5:04am

Britain’s Department for Transport (DfT) has decided not to act unilaterally to impose new restrictions on UK-based aircraft that are registered overseas. Aviation minister Gillian Merron told the GA conference in London that the government will wait for a Europe-wide policy on foreign registration.

December 18, 2006 - 4:56am

Europe’s controlled airspace is to be expanded to absorb air transport growth, leaving the general aviation community with the prospect of paying air traffic management fees and having to adjust to a more complex operating environment.

December 18, 2006 - 4:51am

After a long period of strained relations between the UK general aviation community and the country’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), the two groups are working together constructively to push for the implementation of recommendations from the strategic and regulatory reviews that they jointly concluded in June.

 
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