Aviation International News » March 2009

February 27, 2009 - 8:57am

Bombardier last month said its Global business jets have gained European operational credit for approaches to a 100-foot decision height when pilots use infrared enhanced-vision systems (EVS) and head-up displays. The approval by the European Aviation Safety Agency follows similar endorsements from Transport Canada and the FAA.

February 27, 2009 - 8:56am

Duncan Aviation has certified a Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 upgrade in the Dassault Falcon 50EX. The upgrade interfaces with the airplane’s existing Pro Line 4 avionics package, using original sensors, radios and autopilots. The upgrade provides full Pro Line 21 functionality, including access to graphical weather, electronic charts, airport diagrams, enhanced maps and WAAS LPV approach capability.

February 27, 2009 - 8:54am

FlightSafety International has commissioned the first Gulfstream G450/550 simulator equipped with the synthetic vision-primary flight display (SV-PFD). Specific additional training in the use of SV-PFD (which overlays a computer-generated view of the outside world on the flight displays) isn’t required by the FAA, but pilots have been asking for the chance to become familiar with the technology in the simulator.

February 27, 2009 - 8:53am

Iridium said it has begun taking steps to replace a lost communication satellite with one of eight in-orbit spares. The collision of a 2,000-pound decommissioned Russian satellite with the smaller Iridium craft on February 10 created a swirling field of debris but left only a tiny gap in Iridium’s 66-satellite constellation, resulting in brief outages for some customers.

February 27, 2009 - 8:51am

While it might be a name unfamiliar to many pilots, Baron Services is well known in meteorology circles. The company was originally formed out of a research project with NASA in the late 1980s that dealt with reporting of highly localized lightning data. Baron later expanded the display technology, incorporating radar data to create its first storm-tracking system.

February 27, 2009 - 8:45am

Pilots who have grown accustomed to flying with up-to-the- minute weather graphics and information broadcast to the cockpit through the XM or Sirius satellite radio services are probably aware that the companies successfully completed their “merger of equals” last year. The deal created a combined entity called Sirius XM Radio Inc.

February 27, 2009 - 8:37am

Embraer officially became the third manufacturer to achieve entry-into-service of a very light jet, having delivered two Phenom 100s by the end of last
year following Brazilian ANAC and FAA certification in early December. EASA certification is expected early this year. Embraer had planned to deliver up to

February 27, 2009 - 8:36am

Work is progressing on Spectrum Aeronautical’s all-composite S.40 Freedom midsize jet, but the first-flight dates have been pushed back, from a previously planned end-of-2008 to late 2009 or early 2010, according to director of sales Gary Bushouse. Even with the delays, the Freedom will likely be the next all-composite jet to take flight, now that the Grob SPn program has been halted.

February 27, 2009 - 8:35am

Decades after the last Grumman Goose rolled off the famed manufacturer’s assembly line, the G-21 Goose is nearly ready to come back to life. A company called Antilles Seaplanes, headquartered in Gibsonville, N.C., is resurrecting the Goose and will sell the amphibian as newly manufactured airframes powered by 680-shp (flat-rated) Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34 turboprops instead of the Goose’s original Pratt & Whitney radial engines.

February 27, 2009 - 8:26am

The EASA’s flat fee for a type certificate for a fixed-wing aircraft with an mtow of between 5.7 and 22 metric tons (encompassing the Cessna Citation CJ3 to the Falcon 900 series) is e1.06 million ($1.48 million). For a rotorcraft, it ranges from e20,000 to e525,000 ($28,000 to $735,000). Additional annual fees are levied to pay for the administration processes that ensure continued airworthiness.

 
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