Aviation International News » October 2002

May 7, 2008 - 10:28am

“Why doesn’t the U.S. host a world-class airshow?” It’s a question nearly as old as flight itself. In point of fact, the first recognized air fair per se was held outside Paris in 1909, just six years after the Wright Brothers’ first flight and a full five years before the airplane was about to come into its own as a weapon of war in nearby European skies.

May 7, 2008 - 10:25am

On a blustery day on a deserted beach near Nags Head on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, two brothers began humanity’s controlled adventure away from the surface of the Earth that continues to this day.

May 7, 2008 - 10:11am

As all lawyers know, the letter and the spirit of regulations are two very different things. FAR Part 67 outlines the medical requirements for first-, second- and third-class medicals. The JAA’s JARs (Joint Aviation Requirements) resemble Part 67 in many ways, with the major difference a tighter focus on the specifics of the airman’s physical.

May 7, 2008 - 10:09am

A growing number of aviation medical professionals are questioning pilots’ reliance on their required annual (or, in the case of first-class medicals, six-monthly) medical examinations as their primary source of personal health monitoring.

May 7, 2008 - 10:06am

In a break with long-established practice, Cessna Aircraft has reached an agreement with five independent aircraft brokers for the sale of five used Citation Xs from its own inventory.

May 7, 2008 - 10:03am

Turbine-engine technology development is going in two directions. One is the development of new technology to push the envelope of performance, operational safety, maintainability and reliability. The other is to refine and update existing engines for long-term use, especially in light of more stringent Stage 4 requirements and existing Stage 3 rules.

May 7, 2008 - 9:56am

In light of the comity that almost turned a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on national parks overflights into a “lovefest” early last month, it is difficult to fathom why it has taken more than 15 years to reach agreement on rules for air tours over such noise-sensitive recreational areas.

May 7, 2008 - 9:48am

OK, so we all know that no one ever does anything more than talk about the weather. But the folks at the National Weather Service’s aviation branch are doing their best to make sure that when they do talk about the aviation climate, at least the dialogue is as accurate as possible.

May 7, 2008 - 9:46am

As the crow flies, the distance between Baltimore and Newark is only about 160 mi. But during the height of thunderstorm season, when lines of towering cumulus march eastward–often erupting into wide, impenetrable walls of rain, turbulence and lightning–the distance can easily double, while travel times can triple.

May 7, 2008 - 9:37am

When an airport considers environmental impact on neighbors, noise is usually the top concern, but dealing with water- and air-pollution issues is becoming a more important part of the mix. At an environmental symposium held at Westchester County Airport (HPN) in White Plains, N.Y., on October 17, there was good news on the anti-noise front.

 
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