Aviation International News » September 2002

May 6, 2008 - 5:37am

Switzerland’s Federal Office of Civil Aviation ordered 34 Swiss Air Lines pilots grounded after three of the airline’s flying instructors “failed to fulfill all their formal requirements for their duties.” According to Swiss, it voluntarily agreed to pull the Embraer ERJ-145 pilots from duty, but it called the incident a matter of formality, attributing the violation to a documentation oversight in the instructors’ records.

May 6, 2008 - 5:36am

While most startup airlines enjoy at least a short honeymoon with local press and industry pundits, Michael Jones spent some of his first moments on the job last month as boss of Australia’s newest regional carrier deflecting criticism about his business plan.

May 6, 2008 - 5:33am

American Airlines’ decision last month to retire 74 more Fokker 100s and nine Boeing 767-300s will mean continued capacity stagnation at its wholly owned American Eagle subsidiary, as long as the Allied Pilots Association has its way.

May 6, 2008 - 5:30am

“ISO, the International Organization for Standardization, is simply going to be a requirement to do business in the future, especially in aviation,” Roger Sickler, president of Fort Worth, Texas-based RTS Services and RTS Rework, told AIN. “People are going to want to deal with accredited organizations and ISO is international in scope.

May 6, 2008 - 5:25am

Dateline September 1927: Lindbergh is just back from Paris, and being “air-minded” is the thing. Out in the Wild West, World War I Army flier, entrepreneur and promoter J. Parker Van Zandt creates a runway across a northern Arizona meadow at a place called Red Butte, begins building a hangar and prepares to launch the first commercial air tours over the Grand Canyon.

May 6, 2008 - 5:14am

“Two years ago we were doing Wall Street road shows and rock band tours,” Andy Priester, director of charter operations at Chicago-based Priester Aviation, told AIN last month. “But the economy and world events have made those types of charters now almost extinct. Our new charter customer is the individual who can’t afford to spend five hours waiting for the privilege to get on a cramped airliner.”

May 6, 2008 - 5:10am

Like all high-tech industries, aviation has hardware, software and wetware. The last is a euphemism for the gray matter between a pilot’s ears (or a controller’s, mechanic’s or any other operator’s, for that matter). Over the 10 decades of powered flight, we’ve vastly improved aircraft engines and airframes. In the past two decades or so, computer processors and databases have left their indelible imprint on avionics.

May 6, 2008 - 5:07am

Several French secondary airports are facing threats of closure within two years. The two most endangered are Valence-Chabeuil and Colmar-Houssen Airports.

In each instance, the operator of the airport–the local chamber of commerce–claims that annual losses are too high and wants to discontinue operations. Little support from local authorities makes the problem far from being solved in the long term.

May 6, 2008 - 5:02am

Aviation insurance rates can be affected by the vagaries of the stock and investment markets, insurance claims unrelated to the aviation industry and historic peaks and valleys in policy pricing. And further cost pressures are added because the number of aviation insurers continues to decrease.

May 6, 2008 - 4:59am

On June 6, AvCraft Aviation of Tyler, Texas, received the first STC cabin interior approval for the Fairchild Dornier 328JET, and the aircraft–known as the Envoy 3 in its business aircraft guise–is now in service with an Akron, Ohio advertising and public relations firm, and doing business as Ultimate Air Charters.

 
X