Aviation International News » September 2002

May 6, 2008 - 4:53am

Oracle software chief Larry Ellison can fly his Gulfstream V into and out of San Jose (Calif.) International Airport (SJC) at any time, according to a ruling handed down this summer by a U.S. District Court. Ellison had been cited by the city of San Jose for violating a curfew at the airport, which bars operations of aircraft over 75,000 lb mtow between 11:30 p.m. and 6:30 a.m.

May 6, 2008 - 4:51am

Air Chef, launched just two years ago, is bidding to become the premier business aviation caterer in the U.S., and it is making plans to expand abroad as well. The company, headquartered in the Columbus, Ohio suburb of Worthington, was the brainchild of president Paul Schweitzer and CEO Scott Liston, who created the business plan and raised the outside capital.

May 6, 2008 - 4:49am

Insolvent German airframe builder Fairchild Dornier has turned to one of Russia’s most powerful oligarchs in an attempt to save the foundering 728 and 928 regional jet programs.

May 6, 2008 - 4:43am

Louisiana-based contract pilot Doug Lea is technically on vacation, watching the Sunday afternoon airshow at the Sun ‘n Fun Fly-in in Lakeland, Fla., when his pager goes off. Seeking a location somewhat sheltered from the overhead noise, Lea whips out his cellphone and returns the call, knowing it is one of the seven clients for whom he is currently flying.

May 6, 2008 - 4:38am

Grand Canyon air-tour proponents received yet another blow August 16 when the U.S.

May 6, 2008 - 4:35am

The resilience of general aviation was never more in evidence than at EAA’s AirVenture in late July, when an estimated 750,000 airplane buffs made the annual pilgrimage to east central Wisconsin for the 50th time.

May 6, 2008 - 4:24am

As startling as the absence of current airliners from the Boeing stable was the gaping void created by the lack of any of Russia’s fearsome fighters in the flying display. Many observers felt that the show was the poorer for the lack of the thrust-vectoring wonders of Mikoyan and Sukhoi.

May 6, 2008 - 4:22am

The defense facet of Farnborough 2002 was focused on new technology to be deployed in the war on terror. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)–once an obscure sideshow–moved to center stage. Though confined to the static display line, Northrop Grumman’s Global Hawk surveillance platform–as proven in the recent Afghanistan conflict drew a lot of attention.

May 6, 2008 - 4:18am

As an ostentatious display of western military might, Farnborough 2002 was viewed as a high-profile terrorist target. Organizers were forced to impose a tight security cordon around the site and the event also featured much of the new-generation security technology that has come to the fore in the wake of September 11.

May 6, 2008 - 4:14am

Boeing’s number-crunchers published their long-awaited new commercial market outlook at the Farnborough show–the first full-blown revision of airliner demand since September 11. The new forecast anticipates 24,000 new airplane deliveries over the next 20 years, which is actually 500 units more than the U.S. airframer had envisioned in its 2001 report.

 
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