Aviation International News » September 2002

May 6, 2008 - 4:12am

The biggest engine deal of Farnborough 2002 was undoubtedly FedEx’s selection of the Engine Alliance’s GP7200 engines to power its 10 A380 cargo megaliners. Though the value of the contract was not disclosed, it gives the Pratt & Whitney/General Electric joint venture parity in the A380 powerplant race with its Rolls-Royce rival.

May 5, 2008 - 12:13pm

If a major international airshow can be accepted as an accurate snapshot of the prevailing condition of the world’s aerospace and defense industries, then the picture presented by Farnborough 2002 (held July 22 to 28) clearly showed both as having seen better days. That said, the sell-out event’s 1,200 exhibitors also gave the strong impression that they expect a rosier future, albeit after one or two more years of market stagnation.

May 5, 2008 - 12:02pm

In recent months a number of reports have surfaced of U.S.-citizen business aviation travelers to Canada being denied entry and deported after accurately responding on an immigration questionnaire that they had been convicted of a felony, usually one involving conviction for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI).

May 5, 2008 - 12:00pm

Yes, there is a bill, signed into law by President Clinton in October 2000, that would allow business aircraft operators to enjoy the same visa-waiver convenience afforded certain scheduled airline operators. It would, that is, if the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) had gotten around to integrating the new law into its own regulations.

May 5, 2008 - 11:57am

When General Electric’s then CEO Jack Welch decided it was time to shop for a new business aircraft in 1995, he knew he needed more of what every executive wants in a corporate airplane–space. The Gulfstream V, then under development, was expected to have the range, but on a 12-hr trip, the GE head thought the cabin was too claustrophobic.

May 5, 2008 - 11:39am

When the call went out in those early, panicky hours of the crisis that’s collectively come to be called “9/11,” some 4,500 aircraft were airborne in U.S. airspace. The vast majority of them were Part 121 airliners; this was, after all, the bustling Tuesday morning of what no one knew would be the last day of business as usual for a long time.

May 5, 2008 - 11:31am

Perhaps the sector of aviation most visibly affected by the events of September 11, the airline industry continues its struggle toward recovery, as security burdens, economic jitters and lingering public apprehension over flying conspire to sustain the worst slump in the history of the business.

May 5, 2008 - 11:28am

Following last September 11, aircraft owners and operators began bracing for massive hikes in insurance coverage and changes in the limits of that coverage. Now, a year later, their fears are being realized. But while rates have risen, sometimes triple those before September 11, the increases are not without some justification. The question is, just how much is justified?

May 5, 2008 - 11:22am

One year after September 11, corporate aviation is still seeking assurances that its business aircraft will be able to operate on par with the commercial airlines in the event there is a future shutdown of parts or all of the National Airspace System.

May 5, 2008 - 11:16am

From now until March 29, 2005, business aircraft operators, including those that fly overseas–even if only occasionally–will be required to have a number of additional, and possibly expensive, avionics and other communications, navigation and surveillance (CNS) equipment. This equipment is intended to provide enhanced CNS capabilities for both operators and ATC.

 
X