SuperJet International Poised for Mexican Operations

 - May 6, 2013, 10:15 AM
Mexico’s Interjet expects to take delivery of its first Sukhoi SSJ100 this month.

The 1:20 scale model of a Sukhoi Superjet 100 at the jointly occupied SuperJet International-Powerjet stand at the RAA annual convention in Montreal sports the colors of Mexico’s Interjet for good reason: The Mexico City-based airline expects to take delivery of its first SSJ100 by the end of this month.

A regular exhibitor and high-profile participant in RAA Conventions for the past several years, SuperJet International–the Venice, Italy-based Western sales and support apparatus for the SSJ100–promises to play a “core” role in Interjet’s planned expansion in Mexico and the surrounding region.

Along with its initial order for 15 of the airplanes and subsequent option conversion on another five, Interjet signed on for SuperJet International’s SuperCare “per-flight-hour” aftersales program, supported by a new parts warehouse for the Americas in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. As part of the deal with Interjet, SuperJet has agreed to offer on-site technical support in Mexico with a dedicated engineering team during what the company calls the entry-into-service period and a permanent field service representative on site for three years.

Comments

Jean Ubota's picture

The long expected delivery of the first SSJ to Interjet is the last chance that Sukhoi Civil Aircraft has to prove that they they can succeed in the civilian aircraft making industry.

So long the SSJ operational results with Armavia, Aeroflot, Yakutia, Sky aviation and Lao air lines have been under industry avereage in terms of overall reliability and the aircraft capability of generating profits. The number of flying hours per day waas not published recently. The last numbers were published in december 2012 with the 10 Aeroflot aircraft operational data.

At this date the SSJ is likely to be technically ready for long term operational operation under the mexican operational conditions after more than two years of operations with the above mentioned airlines.

The next most important factor affecting operational success is the technical support that SCAC can provide at Interjet operational bases in terms of the average number of hours it takes to obtain spare parts which greatly affects the aircraft dispatch time and thus the overall reliability.

Also in this matter, one has also to consider the technicians SSJ training and their ability to service and resolve problems in coordination with the aircraft manufacturer and engine manufacturer as well and the availability of a «dedicated engineering team during the entry-into-service period and a permanent field service representative on site for three years» is a very welcomed minimum requirement in this operational context.

Jean Ubota

The SCAC new direction put in place in january 2013 has spent much time in implementing all logistical and technical support to ensure that the first SSJ implementation in North America with the interjet contract be followed by many other ones.

Another point of concern with the SSJ is the SCAC low capacity to build aircraft in sufficient number to fill orders. The SCAC manufacturing capability is well under the planned one of 3 aircraft per month as announced in late 2012 for the beginning of 2013. If all deliveries to aeroflot (1 aircraft) and interjet( 2 aircraft) are performed on time until the 18 june 2013 the SCAC delivery will be of only one aircraft per month as since the the 18 december 2012 SCAC will have delivered only 7 aircraft in months which is a very low throughput. The total number of aircraft delivered by SCAC since the 19 april 2011 is only 15 as of 15 may 2013 and 3 aircraft are expected to be delivered relatively shortly. The last delivery date was the 27 february 2013 to Sky Aviation.

Jean Ubota

Max's picture

So long the SSJ operational results with Armavia, Aeroflot, Yakutia, Sky aviation and Lao air lines have been under industry avereage in terms of overall reliability and the aircraft capability of generating profits.
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How do you know this? I don't think you have access to financial records of all of those companies to make such claim.

P.S. No offense

Jean Ubota's picture

The main factor in airvraft serviceability is the technical support at the airlines's operational bases. Large aurcraft builders such as Bombardier and Embraer have the capability to provide their customers with a broad range of technical support. SCAC is still striving to build a reliable and responsive support base to his customer such as Aeroflot and Interjet more importantly as it is the first client in North America.

The SSJ 100 operational results with aeroflot were not satisfactory due to a combination of factors such as:
1. the aircraft still had outsatanding technical problems which caused failures,
2. Unvailability of spares parts in terms of the number of hours it takes to get the componet to the aircraft base, for exemple, 4 , 8 , 12 , 24, 48 hours etc,
3. Tecnicians ability to pinpoint pproblems,
4. Availability of local engeenering support at airlines operational bases.

The overall effet of 1-4 is the low per day avereage flying hour of 4 as compared to 8 for mature aircraft.

This reflects on general aircraft availability and thus on airlines profits. Sukchoi had to give aeroflot compensation for the losses due to the low availability of the SSJ 100.

However as performance will improve with technical support profit will rise too.

Jean Ubota

Jean Ubota

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