Accidents, Safety, Security and Training » Safety

News and information on safety procedures and concerns.

October 14, 2009 - 12:03pm

Each year, NBAA recognizes the top aviation maintenance and avionics technicians with excellent safety records who work for member companies. Maintaining corporate aircraft or avionics for three accident-free years is the minimum requirement for an NBAA Safety Award but the actual number of years for many of the top technicians adds up to four decades or more.

October 14, 2009 - 11:34am

The National Business Aviation Association presents Pilot Flying Safety Awards each year to the member company pilots who have exemplary safety records. To be eligible for an award, a pilot must have flown corporate aircraft 1,500 hours without an accident, but the actual number of safe hours flown by many of the 2008 top pilots is around 25,000 hours, and the top recipient, George Thomsen, has logged 31,002.

October 14, 2009 - 11:18am

Any safety expert who wants to improve accident statistics could learn a lot by observing the Mitsubishi MU-2 situation. Since the issuance of the final rule outlining special training regulations for MU-2 pilots, there has been only one accident, and that was nonfatal. This contrasts markedly with the MU-2’s accident history before the enactment of the special FAR (SFAR).

October 14, 2009 - 9:28am

CharterX Wyvern has endorsed the NBAA’s recently published NBAA Best Practices for Air Charter Brokering. The NBAA’s best-practices protocols include operational guidelines and safety oversight procedures.

October 14, 2009 - 9:22am

Like the rest of the aviation industry, the charter segment has suffered serious setbacks during the past year and is hunkering down and adapting to a new marketplace characterized by smaller companies, lower prices and less flying.

October 14, 2009 - 6:52am

The International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO), launched in 2002 by the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), has been granted official European recognition as an industry safety standard for business aircraft operations.

October 14, 2009 - 6:22am

In recent years the FAA has focused a majority of its birdstrike research efforts on the use of avian radar systems. The effectiveness of bird radars has been well documented, but many companies–including the radar manufacturers themselves–acknowledge that radar technology alone won’t eliminate the problem.

October 14, 2009 - 6:13am

The number of birdstrikes reported annually in the U.S. rose from 1,759 in 1990 to 7,666 in 2007, and by Jan. 15, 2009, the statistics finally caught up with US Airways Flight 1549, piloted by the now famous Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger and first officer Jeffrey Skiles.

October 14, 2009 - 5:48am

One of the founders and innovators of the TKS anti-icing system plans to launch the world’s first environmentally friendly anti-icing fluid called TKS Sustain, based on propane diol rather than the more traditional ethylene glycol. Kilfrost, exhibiting here at Booth No. 5513, has submitted the product for certification and expects to gain approval to market it this coming winter.

October 13, 2009 - 12:12pm

Richard Komarniski, who has for 16 years been teaching human factors and safety subjects, spoke on Monday at the NBAA IA renewal session on safety management systems (SMS). Komarniski is founder of Grey Owl Aviation Consultants, which recently signed a letter of understanding with the FAA Safety Team welcoming Grey Owl as a national industry member specializing in human factors and SMS training.

 
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