A123 Systems

October 23, 2014 - 2:00pm

True Blue Power recently received TSO approval from the FAA and ETSO approval from the EASA for its TB44 main-ship lithium-ion battery. Its Li-ion products use nanophosphate technology that was initially developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and introduced commercially by A123 Systems. OEMs are now integrating the TB17 (17 amp-hour) and TB44 (44 amp-hour) batteries into 11 business jets and helicopters. The batteries will also be offered as an STC retrofit for in-service King Airs, Caravans and PC-12s.

October 21, 2013 - 3:01pm
True Blue TB44

Mid-Continent Instrument’s True Blue Power division introduced two new lithium-ion main-ship batteries yesterday, designed for jets, turboprops, piston airplanes and helicopters. The new 28-volt batteries come in two sizes: the TB44 (44 ampere hours) and TB17 (17 ampere hours), and can be seen at Mid-Continent’s NBAA exhibit (Booth No. C10040). These new batteries, which will be certified and ready for deliveries in the fourth quarter this year, are first being offered to aircraft manufacturers and not yet to the aftermarket.

March 1, 2013 - 3:10am

Only one business jet thus far has been certified with a lithium-ion main-ship battery, Cessna’s Citation CJ4, which employed lithium-iron phosphate technology, unlike the lithium-cobalt oxide chemistry in the Boeing 787 batteries. No other business jet has been certified with a lithium-ion main-ship battery, although Gulfstream had planned to employ a lithium-ion battery in the G650 before switching to a nickel-cadmium battery while the aircraft was still working its way toward certification.

October 4, 2012 - 2:33am

Sometime in 2011 (we can’t be sure when), an airport worker hooked up an energized ground-power unit to a Cessna Citation CJ4 (525C), according to the FAA. The CJ4 was the first business jet certified with a lithium-ion main-ship battery.

 
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