Cessna Citation M2 Makes Maiden Flight

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Citation M2
The Cessna Citation M2, a CJ1+ derivative launched in late September at the NBAA Convention in Las Vegas, achieved its maiden flight today from the aircraft manufacturer’s headquarters at Wichita Mid-Continent Airport. According to Cessna, the M2 prototype’s inaugural flight lasted a little more than an hour and a half and included tests of its Garmin G3000 avionics, autopilot, Williams FJ44-1AP-21 engines and aircraft systems.
March 9, 2012, 6:42 PM

The Cessna Citation M2, a CJ1+ derivative launched in late September at the NBAA Convention in Las Vegas, achieved its maiden flight today from the aircraft manufacturer’s headquarters at Wichita Mid-Continent Airport. According to Cessna, the M2 prototype’s inaugural flight lasted a little more than an hour and a half and included tests of its Garmin G3000 avionics, autopilot, Williams FJ44-1AP-21 engines and aircraft systems.

“I am excited to say the aircraft performance, handling characteristics and Garmin G3000 avionics were exceptional, just as we had anticipated,” said Peter Fisher, Cessna’s engineering test pilot who flew the Citation M2. “With this essential program milestone complete, we are looking forward to a successful flight test program and FAA certification so our customers can soon enjoy this great aircraft.”

The twinjet derivative will fit into the Citation line as a step-up for Mustang owners or as a higher entry-level Citation between the Mustang and CJ2+. Using the CJ1+ airframe as its platform, the new variant features the Garmin G3000 avionics suite, 1,965-pound-thrust Fadec Williams FJ44-1AP-21 engines, subtle winglets and, compared with its predecessor, higher-quality interior furnishings and greater speed.

Perhaps more important, however, the M2 lops about $800,000 off what the CJ1+ cost when Cessna quit building that airplane last year. Competing nose-to-nose with Embraer’s $3.91 million Phenom 100, the M2 carries a price tag of $4.195 million. The cost savings stemmed mostly from switching to a Garmin suite from the CJ1+’s Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 system, as well as better pricing on engines from Williams

For certification and pilot type ratings, the M2 retains the type designation C525. Among the M2’s specs: max cruise speed, 400 knots; time to climb to 41,000 feet, 24 minutes; mtow, 10,700 pounds; mission fuel, 3,309 pounds; and full-fuel payload with one pilot, 500 pounds. FAA certification is scheduled for the second half of next year, with entry into service by the end of next year.

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CS Moore
on March 12, 2012 - 4:40pm

Typical Cessna 500 pounds useful load, fuel or people airplane, fill seats no fuel, fill fuel no people. The only reason they are selling is the single pilot certification, for the CHEAP companies who do not value their lieves by having two pilots in the cockpit.

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Johnny Royalton
on March 12, 2012 - 9:43pm

Single pilot capability.... For Cheap companies? Let's look again. First of all, when you purchase a Citation it also includes training for two (2) pilots and a mechanic at Flight Safety. Single pilot ops training is no push over training either. Recurrency is every 6 months instead of 12 months.
The single pilot ops is an option. Owner/Operators are the norm. The Boss (a pilot) flies with a professional pilot which is his full time job. The bosses are smart enough flying these Citations and know their limitations and are in a co-pilot role when necessary. AND the option is there to fly "single pilot" It's not always solid IFR everywhere all the time. And you say Cheap? Call the insurance companies and ask about how much more it is to insure a single pilot operation even though recurrency is twice a year. I have been around Cessna when the first single pilot Citation 501-0001 was introduced in 1977 and our safety record will stand on its own. A quality product, service after the sale with a service network that surpasses any of the competition and quality training for the people that fly them. That my friend is what makes single pilot operations work. As for the 500 pounds, yes, Cessna would very much like to give you more. Customers ask for short field capability, flexibility, comfort and speed. There are some trades offs and it comes with a lower useful load with full fuel. And tell me how many times during a given week when your car is fill to capacity with people? Then tell me how many times you run through a full tank of gas on one trip. My guess is not too often. Time will tell if we offered what the world needs in this class of Citation. Cessna did their homework. I think this product will do very well. And does Cessna value the "Lives" that fly in our Citations? YES, YES, WE DO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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CS Moore
on March 13, 2012 - 3:52pm

Johnny, I too have been arround aviation since 1968, getting first jet type rating in 1978. Bill Lear also used the car analogy with the 23/24 telling prospective buyers that they didn't get up and walk arround while driving in their cars, and stopped to pee after 2-3 hours, to sell them on cabin size and range. Presently flying "legacy" C550, without aftermarket GW increase, which limits it to people in the seats or fuel in the tanks, full fuel NO people other than 2 pilots! You are correct in the collusion between FSI and the insurance industry, pay one or the other, or hire another pilot. Cost isn't broken out for the buyer of a new product, where it is "included" in the purchase, but the follow up buyer takes that into consideration with a used aircraft on a budget.

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bcvaughan
on March 13, 2012 - 5:35pm

it always cheers me up to read articles like this 'cause afterwards i don't feel so bad about the 465 lb ff payload in my old mooney, . . . ;-)

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CJ Pilot
on November 7, 2012 - 5:10pm

Vaughan,
You must be one of those pilots who just has to gripe about everything that doesn't either make sense to you or anything that doesn't make sense to you....
I wonder why the Citation fleet is the largest business jet fleet in the world....
...
No comment on the Mooney...they still sell planes?

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