Aeronautical Information Manual

September 24, 2012 - 2:32pm

A recent update to the FAA’s aeronautical information manual (AIM) specifically wants to refocus how pilots use their transponders on the ground. For years, most pilots became used to ensuring transponders were turned off until takeoff or as part of the after-landing checks. The AIM now says, “Civil and military transponders should be turned ‘on’ to the normal altitude-reporting position prior to moving on the surface to ensure the aircraft is visible to ATC [ground] surveillance systems.”

October 27, 2010 - 10:40am

The FAA has concluded that two Boston Air Charter pilots were in violation of the FARs when they took off in their respective Cessna Citations from Norwood Memorial Airport (Mass.) on March 17, during which time the field was closed due to flooding. The pilots face a proposed 30-day suspension of their airman certificates.

September 30, 2010 - 12:25pm

The FAA has concluded that two Boston Air Charter pilots were in violation of the FARs when they took off in their respective Cessna Citations from Norwood Memorial Airport (Mass.) on March 17, during which time the field was closed due to flooding. The pilots face a proposed 30-day suspension of their airman certificates.

November 27, 2007 - 10:39am

Spotted what you think could be a UFO? Don’t call the FAA. Instead, contact the National Institute for Discovery Sciences (NIDS). A recent amendment to the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) states, “NIDS is the single point of contact recognized by the FAA in regard to UFO information.

July 23, 2007 - 10:57am

Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House aviation subcommittee and self-described “persistent bastard,” continues to rail against the lack of action in reopening Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) to most general aviation operations.

July 3, 2007 - 5:32am

The FAA has issued guidance on altitude and speed constraints in Rnav procedures. In the document, InFO 07011, the agency said that adherence to speed and altitude is especially important when flying Rnav procedures. The agency emphasizes that the phrases “resume normal speed,” “maintain” and “speed your discretion” do not cancel published speed restrictions, but rather those most recently issued by ATC.

April 30, 2007 - 10:37am

The FAA released official guidance last month regarding ATC’s ability to define and describe precipitation to pilots, including the terms controllers will use to describe the area of weather. With the advancement in radar technology, controllers can now determine the level of precipitation in the atmosphere, as opposed to simply where an area might be present.

 
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