Aerospace engineering

May 9, 2008 - 7:18am

GULFSTREAM IV AND BELL 206, SAN DIEGO, CALIF., MAY 12, 2001–Thirteen people–pilots, passengers and line-service personnel–escaped injury when the rotor blades of an engine-starting helicopter smacked into the winglets of a taxiing GIV. The incident happened on a ramp at the San Diego International-Lindbergh Airport (SAN) around 5 p.m.

May 8, 2008 - 9:23am

Dassault has settled on a new, smaller version of the Rockwell Collins Flight Dynamics HGS 4000 head-up display as an option for its 5,700-nm Falcon 7X trijet. The 7X HGS will provide a wider field of view and larger glass for better viewing during crosswind landings and circling approaches, said Rockwell Collins.

May 8, 2008 - 9:21am

Last month NASA made the first flight of an experimental “wing warping” Boeing F/A-18 flying testbed. In 1903 the Wright Brothers used wires connected to their control column to twist the wings of their Flyer, changing the airfoils’ shape to provide differential lift to control bank. NASA calls the 21st century version of wing warping the “active aeroelastic wing,” or AAW.

May 7, 2008 - 7:22am

Aviation Partners now expects to receive certification of its winglets for the Hawker 800 next May, nearly a year later than originally planned. Failure to obtain certain engineering data from Raytheon Aircraft caused the delay, according to Aviation Partners. The Seattle company claims winglets allow the “Hawker 800SP” to fly 30 min longer or 180 nm further and 18 kt faster than a standard Hawker 800.

May 7, 2008 - 5:58am

A fixture at Van Nuys (Calif.) Airport (VNY) for decades, Clay Lacy Aviation now has a second location. Together with Joe Clark, CEO of Seattle-based winglet pioneer Aviation Partners (though that company is not involved in the deal), Lacy has acquired the former Flight Center at Seattle Boeing Field (BFI) and renamed it the Clay Lacy Flight Center. Terms were not disclosed.

May 6, 2008 - 12:21pm

FOKKER F28-100, Manchester, UK, APRIL 6, 2002–A misunderstanding of the flight manual resulted in damage to the horizontal stabilizer tip and leading edge of a Fokker F28 Mark 0100 (G-UKFI) at Manchester Airport. There were no injuries to those aboard, including the ATP-rated captain and his copilot.

May 6, 2008 - 12:03pm

ENSTROM F-28C, NEAR MEDICINE BOW, WYO., JUNE 10, 2002–N5694Z, operated by Falcon Helicopter and piloted by a commercial-rated pilot, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at 9:45 a.m. near Medicine Bow. The pilot sustained serious injuries, and the passenger received only minor injuries. The weather was reported to be VMC for the flight, which originated in Laramie, Wyo., at 7:30 a.m.

May 6, 2008 - 11:35am

Piper is working on boosting the max takeoff weight for its Meridian turboprop single to create a 15-percent increase in useful load. By the end of the year, Piper said it will receive certification of aerodynamic and structural changes to its Meridian that will allow a 242-lb increase in mtow from 4,850 lb to 5,092 lb.

May 6, 2008 - 9:47am

Early next year Boeing will offer a kit for BBJs and BBJ2s that will provide a 6,500-ft cabin at FL 410 instead of the standard 8,000-ft cabin. The kit, which can be installed on green and in-service BBJs, is expected to cost less than $100,000. Components include new cabin-pressure-controller boxes with revised software, a new cabin-altitude indicator and two pressure-relief valves.

May 5, 2008 - 11:01am

Economical, practical, environmentally friendly supersonic flight is the next big thing in commercial aviation. Or is it? From where aeronautical technology stands today, practical supersonic flight (and by “practical,” we do not mean the Anglo-French Concorde, which generates noise and atmospheric pollution levels that preclude all but the smallest volumes of operation) is far off.

 
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