Airmanship

November 30, 2007 - 11:28am

While corporate aviation has an enviable safety record, one comparable to that of the airlines, some flight departments operate on a shoestring budget with inadequately experienced or trained crews or shoddy maintenance practices, according to NTSB chairman Mark Rosenker.

May 10, 2007 - 6:28am

Bombardier is to hold its first Safety Standdown event in Europe at the end of this week’s European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition here in Geneva. The gathering will consist of a full day of seminars at the Crowne Plaza Hotel (next to the Palexpo convention center) on Friday, May 25, preceded by a reception on Thursday evening.

February 16, 2007 - 6:18am

A University of North Dakota (UND) Citation II research jet made an emergency landing near Beaver, Alaska, on September 30 after both engines flamed out at 9,200 feet msl in clouds. Unable to accomplish an airstart, pilot Paul DeHardy “maneuvered the aircraft to a successful emergency landing 70 miles north of Fairbanks, Alaska.” None of the four crewmembers, one of whom is a researcher with Sikorsky Aircraft, sustained injuries.

February 13, 2007 - 3:56am

The NTSB recently concluded its investigations into two King Air fatal accidents, attributing the probable causes to the pilots. IMC was a factor in both accidents. On Jan. 31, 2004, the pilot and his teenage son were killed when their C90 broke up in flight and crashed into the Everglades about 10 minutes after departing Florida Keys Airport.

January 12, 2007 - 4:22am

The NTSB concluded that the “unprofessional behavior” and “poor airmanship” of the pilots caused the Oct. 14, 2004 crash of a Pinnacle Airlines Bombardier CRJ. The two pilots (the only people aboard) were killed. After the pilots took the regional jet to its maximum operating altitude of 41,000 feet, both engines quit.

October 17, 2006 - 7:59am

A University of North Dakota (UND) Cessna Citation II icing research aircraft made a successful deadstick landing near Beaver, Alaska, about 70 miles north of Fairbanks, after both engines lost power on September 30. In IMC at 9,200 feet, the Citation accumulated about seven-eighths of an inch of ice on the wing’s leading edge.

 
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