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April 30, 2014 - 11:10am

JetSeat is offering drug-and-alcohol testing programs for FAR Part 145 repair stations worldwide. FAA Part 91, 135 and 145 operators are required to implement and administer drug-and-alcohol testing programs that include written policy; drug-and-alcohol testing; supervisor and employee training for all safety-sensitive positions; and a continuing drug-and-alcohol abuse prevention program.

October 7, 2008 - 2:43pm

“Direct observation” of aviation employees during drug and alcohol tests applies only to individuals who are returning to duty after a previous positive test, or if there is reasonable suspicion. The tests apply to only Part 121 and 135 operations, although some Part 91 operators follow the regulations, according to Dr. Quay Snyder, president and CEO of Virtual Flight Surgeons, Aurora, Colo.

January 10, 2007 - 11:57am

The FAA on Tuesday issued a final rule amending Part 121 regulations governing drug and alcohol testing to clarify that “each person who performs a safety-sensitive function for a regulated employer by contract, including by subcontract at any tier, is subject to testing.” These amendments are necessary, the FAA said, because guidance has been conflicting for more than a decade “about which contractors were subject to drug and alcohol testing.

December 6, 2006 - 1:03pm

According to Universal Weather, ground handling in the Middle East has improved, driven by increased traffic and expectations of higher levels of service. Dubai, which serves a higher volume of business aviation traffic than most other Middle East destinations, remains the standard bearer.

Nevertheless, flight handlers offer some warnings that may not seem instinctive to Western visitors:

December 6, 2006 - 10:26am

The FAA has determined that the minimum random drug and alcohol testing percentage rates for next year will remain at 25 percent of safety-sensitive employees for random drug testing and 10 percent of safety-sensitive employees for random alcohol testing. These rates have remained unchanged since 1998, when they were first set.

November 3, 2006 - 3:33am

The FAA is proposing to amend airman medical standards so that refusing to submit to a required drug or alcohol test carries the same penalty as failing a test–revocation of an airman medical certificate. The same penalty awaits a pilot with an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater. Comments on the proposal are due March 14. For more information, call the FAA at (202) 267-8693.

 
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