Autobrake

April 5, 2012 - 2:55pm
Dassault Falcon 2000S On Track for Certification This Year

The Falcon 2000S has completed its first year of flight testing, having logged “nearly 300 flight hours in more than 100 flights,” Dassault announced yesterday. The twinjet so far has confirmed its “expected performance.”

Features include inboard slats and an autobrake system that allow shorter landings.

January 5, 2011 - 3:56am

A problem with a weight on wheels (WOW) switch is being eyed in the American Airlines Boeing 757-200 that ran off the end of snow contaminated Runway 19 at Jackson Hole, Wyo., on December 29. The flight from Chicago with 181 aboard ended up in the snow 658 feet beyond the end of the 6,300-foot-long runway; however, there were no injuries or damage to the aircraft.

June 19, 2010 - 1:01pm

Dassault received EASA and the FAA approval for the autobrake feature on the Falcon 2000EX series, which includes the 2000EX, 2000EX EASy, 2000DX and 2000LX. Designed for short runways, the feature adds greater safety margins by reducing landing distances by as much as 150 feet on normal approaches and 300 feet on steep approaches.

May 26, 2010 - 9:21am

Dassault is about to receive certification for a “nose-up autobrake” feature to further cut Falcon 2000-series landing distances, chief test pilot Philippe Deleume told AIN last month. The technique will reduce landing distances by approximately 150 feet, thus helping the 2000DX/EX/LX meet London City Airport requirements.

May 4, 2010 - 8:09am

Dassault is about to receive certification of a “nose-up autobrake” feature to further cut Falcon 2000 series landing distances, chief test pilot Philippe Deleume told AIN here at EBACE 2010. The result is a landing distance approximately 150 feet shorter. The new system will help the aircraft (in its DX, EX and LX versions) meet London City airport requirements.

May 4, 2010 - 7:35am

Dassault is set to receive certification of a “nose-up autobrake” feature to further cut the landing distances of several Falcon 2000-series airplanes, thus helping the types obtain approval for operations into London City airport. “The system is transparent to the pilot,” chief test pilot Philippe Deleume told AIN today at EBACE. During the approach, the crew just has to activate the autobrake button.

August 8, 2008 - 9:55am

One of the most expensive consumable items on an aircraft is becoming less expensive to operate. Hydro-Aire, a part of Crane Aerospace & Electronics, has signed a licensing agreement with Dunlop Aerospace’s aviation braking systems division of Coventry, England, for braking system software designed to increase aircraft brake life significantly.

November 1, 2007 - 4:34am

The NTSB last month made an “urgent” recommendation to the FAA in response to the December 2005 fatal runway overrun at Chicago Midway Airport, calling for the agency to require operators to conduct arrival landing-distance assessments before every landing based on existing performance data and actual conditions, and to incorporate a safety margin of at least 15 percent.

October 4, 2007 - 1:08pm

The NTSB determined Tuesday that the probable cause of the Dec. 5, 2005 landing overrun of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 at Chicago Midway Airport was the pilots' failure to use reverse thrust to slow the airplane after landing. This occurred because the pilots' lack of experience with the airplane's autobrake system distracted them from using the thrust reversers, the Safety Board said.

September 27, 2007 - 6:58am

Airbus A300-600F, El Paso, Texas, June 10, 2002–The NTSB determined that the cause of the tail strike the FedEx Airbus suffered on takeoff from El Paso International was the flight crew’s failure to obtain Vr speed before rotation, which resulted in insufficient lift. The crew had entered the V-speeds in the flight-management system (FMS) and both crewmembers’ primary flight displays (PFDs) showed no discrepancies.

 
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