Cessna Citation X

October 31, 2012 - 12:00pm
Cessna Citation X

A Cessna Citation X equipped with Winglet Technology (Booth No. 1743) elliptical winglets set an unofficial speed record October 28 by flying 3,479 nm nonstop from Anchorage to Miami in seven hours and 13 minutes at an average speed of 482 knots. Details of the flight have been submitted to the National Aeronautic Association for review and certification for jet aircraft in the Class.I.I.(35,274 to 44,092 pounds mtow) category. The aircraft was flown by Al Larson and Chuck Feaga.

October 29, 2012 - 2:25pm
SmartStem system

Crane Aerospace & Electronics has received a number of new product approvals and selections on a variety of business jets. Crane’s FAA-approved SmartStem wireless tire pressure monitoring system now allows Part 135 pilots to check tire pressures on all certified aircraft. “There are presently no other products on the market that allow a Part 135 pilot to check his own tires,” the company noted.

September 4, 2012 - 3:40pm

The transonic speed spat between Cessna’s Citation Ten and Gulfstream’s G650 is likely to hit of the stops at Mach 0.95 when it encounters not “the sound barrier” but required safety margins. With the Ten’s top speed now pegged at Mach 0.935, Gulfstream’s G650 could thus leapfrog the Ten only slightly, if the Savannah-based aircraft manufacturer even chooses to do so.

August 28, 2012 - 4:20pm
Cessna Citation Ten

On Friday, Cessna announced that it has raised the top speed for its Citation Ten to Mach 0.935, which would make it the fastest civil aircraft in service once certified. This eclipses the speed of its Citation X predecessor by Mach 0.015 and the currently stated top speed of the soon-to-be-certified Gulfstream G650 by Mach 0.010.

August 16, 2012 - 3:38pm

Cessna Aircraft announced today at LABACE that it has again increased the range–to 2,500 nm–of its in-development, midsize Citation Latitude. When announced at the NBAA Convention last year, the Latitude was originally expected to have a range of 2,000 nm. In February, Cessna stretched the airplane’s legs to 2,300 nm, and after further discussions with customers it decided to extend the range again, to 2,500 nm.

August 16, 2012 - 3:10pm

L-3 Avionics Systems announced today that the FAA has granted TSO approval for its GH-3900 electronic standby instrument system. Several business aircraft OEMs have selected the GH-3900 as standard equipment, including Bombardier for the Learjet 70/75 and Cessna for the Citation Ten. Additionally, Rockwell Collins has selected the GH-3900 ESIS for its Pro Line Fusion Flight Deck. The primary flight display backup instrument is capable of meeting airworthiness requirements for almost any fixed- or rotary-wing transport-category aircraft, says L-3.

August 8, 2012 - 1:50pm

Cleveland Hopkins International Airport-based Constant Aviation has completed its fifth winglet modification on the Citation X. According to the company, adding the winglet option allows the aircraft to climb directly to 34,000 feet in 29 minutes, compared with a 93-minute step climb without the winglets, increasing range by 160 nm. It also allows the Citation X to depart from high/hot airports with 1,200 pounds more payload or depart with the pre-winglets payload and fly 400 nm farther, according to Stephen Maiden, the MRO facility’s president.

July 4, 2012 - 2:05pm

The FAA proposes an airworthiness directive for the Cessna 750 Citation X prompted by reports of direct current (DC) generator overvoltage events. The generator control unit (GCU) overvoltage protection circuit can become damaged and allow high voltage to pass through to the airplane systems and electrical components, which, if not corrected, could result in smoke in the cockpit and loss of avionics and electrical systems.

May 14, 2012 - 10:16am
Longitude

Six months after launching its midsize Citation Latitude, Cessna (Stand 7081) announced at EBACE this morning that it will offer a $25.9 million (2012 dollars) stretched version–the “Longitude–that can fly 4,000 nm at Mach 0.82.

May 13, 2012 - 6:00am
SafeFlight

Safe Flight Instrument announced last month that its AutoPower autothrottle has been approved as an STC by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration for installation on the Hawker Beechcraft Hawker 900, 850, 800 and 750 jets. AutoPower will also be STCed for Cessna’s Citation X this summer by the Cessna Wichita Citation Service Center and will be offered as a retrofit on all Citation Xs.

 
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