Civil aviation authority

February 24, 2014 - 2:05pm

Ghana’s Civil Aviation Authority has grounded all McDonnell Douglas DC-8s registered in the African country. The CAA apparently issued the grounding on December 31 last year but published the notice on its website only last week. The CAA gave no reason for the grounding notice. The only two DC-8 operators in Ghana are on the European Union’s list of banned airlines.

November 4, 2013 - 2:30pm

The UK’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has launched an industry-wide project to identify smaller airports within Britain that could benefit from the development of new instrument approach procedures. All industry sectors from airport managers to air traffic controllers to pilots and commercial operators are encouraged to offer suggestions on potential airport recipients.

October 28, 2013 - 11:00am

UK air navigation services provider NATS has started a 14-week “consultation” process through January 21 to gather comments from airlines and other interested groups on proposed airspace changes surrounding Gatwick and London City airports. The consultation marks the first step in a wider program of proposed changes under the UK Civil Aviation Authority’s Future Airspace Strategy, an ATC modernization plan for the UK and Ireland.

October 21, 2013 - 1:00pm

The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) has denounced an October 15 press report that claimed 58 percent of aircraft in South Africa do not have airworthiness certificates. The authority said the story was both inaccurate and irresponsible, insisting that its main point was based on a statement made by a member of the South African parliament that was taken out of context.

September 16, 2013 - 2:00pm

The UK Parliament’s Transport Committee has criticized the European Union’s proposed flight- and duty-time regulations, saying that while they represent an improvement over the current versions, some of the new rules seem to fly in the face of current scientific research. The changes, driven by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), are expected to take effect in November this year.

September 1, 2013 - 12:35am
TBM850 operator Voldirect is one of several operators approved for commercial flights in IMC.

Flying commercially using a single-engine aircraft under instrument flight rules (SECIFR) or at night may be taken for granted in the U.S., but it has not been possible in Europe–until now. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has cracked the door open–first for cargo operators and more recently, in the past few months, for flights carrying fare-paying passengers. It has left the decision to individual countries’ regulators, however, and France and Finland have taken the lead.

July 24, 2013 - 11:25am

The Gulfstream Beijing Service Center recently received authorization to service Gulfstream aircraft registered in Hong Kong and Macau. The approval was granted through a joint maintenance management (JMM) agreement among the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC), the Civil Aviation Department of Hong Kong and the Civil Aviation Authority of Macau SAR.

July 15, 2013 - 1:10pm

India’s Directorate-General of Civil Aviation’s (DGCA) days as a regulator appear to be numbered now that the country’s government has approved “in principle” a new Civil Aviation Authority to replace it. India’s information and broadcasting minister explained that the new CAA will be an autonomous body tasked with looking at aviation safety issues and composed of a chairperson and at least seven but not more than nine other members. No date for the next step toward approving the CAA has been announced.

May 18, 2013 - 11:20am

New risk and safety management requirements imposed by the European Aviation Safety Agency are continuing to take up a lot of management time at TAG and other aircraft operators. TAG recently became the first business aviation company to achieve EASA’s stage-two requirements for its safety management system.

April 14, 2013 - 8:00pm

With the rapid development of China’s economy, business aviation is viewed by many in the country as a so-called “Blue Ocean industry” with vast potential. As estimated by Embraer in its last market forecast, by 2020 China may represent a market for as many as 635 business jets. Bombardier is even more optimistic, projecting a need for almost 1,000 more business jets in the coming decade.

 
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