Computer Assisted Passenger Prescreening System

February 22, 2010 - 7:00am

Following up on testimony before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) said it is backing off from tougher security rules for general aviation that were first proposed in October 2008.

October 27, 2008 - 12:19pm

Here is how one charter operator describes complying with the Twelve-Five Standard Security Program, which shares many elements with the TSA’s proposed Large Aircraft Security Program. Note that under the proposed rule, operators will not have access
to the no-fly list but will have to pay a third-party provider to check passenger names against the list.

December 6, 2007 - 9:26am

Aviation Technologies has created what it believes is a solution to the time-consuming process of checking air passenger and employee names against Transportation Security Administration (TSA) “no-fly” and “selectee no-fly cleared” and “selectee cleared” watch-lists. Those lists now total more than 120,000 people, most of whom are barred from flying or for whom additional security measures are necessary.

October 30, 2007 - 11:14am
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The Transportation Security Administration plans soon to release changes to the voluntary general aviation security guidelines, and is looking at ways to “positively identify” pilots before and in flight. To find out more about what the TSA is doing, and how it views GA security in general, AIN spoke with Michal Morgan, the TSA’s general manager for general aviation.

 

October 3, 2007 - 11:29am

Business aviation may win a few more converts as a result of the most recent Transportation Security Administration (TSA) edict expanding the use of manual pat-down searches during “secondary” screening.

March 22, 2007 - 11:43am

The U.S. Senate has passed a legislation package addressing many of the 9/11 Commission’s aviation security recommendations that have not yet found their way into law. Notably, the proposed rules would give the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) one year to develop a threat assessment program for general aviation airports, as well as conduct a study on the feasibility of providing grants to these airports for security upgrades.

October 11, 2006 - 6:35am

Language included in the federal homeland security funding bill encourages the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to continue moving forward on expanding the TSA Access Certificate (TSAAC), a voluntary general aviation security program now being tested by 24 business aviation operators at three New York-area general aviation airports. In December, the TSA endorsed TSAAC and committed to work with the industry to expand the program.

 
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