Energy development

February 24, 2010 - 6:48am

As government and industry plan for more environmentally friendly energy sources, companies continue to invest in and research alternative fuels for aviation. The U.S. Air Force, one of the government’s largest consumers of fuel, for example, has set a goal that 50 percent of its fuel purchases be composed of domestic synthetic fuel blends by 2016, while IATA has presented a target of 10-percent alternative fuel use for its members by 2017.

January 27, 2010 - 4:08am

The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) was awarded a nearly $50 million six-year research grant from the Air Force to develop advanced fuels and combustion technologies. A key area in the UDRI program will be the development, validation and field testing of synthetic fuels, including biofuels from varied feed stocks.

December 28, 2009 - 10:58am

Purdue University has received a $1.35 million grant from the U.S. Air Force to establish a new facility to test aircraft engines and develop alternative fuels. The National Test Facility for Fuels and Propulsion–which is expected to open late this year or early next–will be located at Purdue Airport in the school’s Niswonger Aviation Technology Building.

December 23, 2009 - 10:04am

The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has been awarded a nearly $50 million six-year research grant from the Air Force to develop advanced fuels and combustion technologies. The award follows last year’s $10 million contract with the Air Force Research Laboratory to design and operate the new Assured Aerospace Fuels Research Laboratory at nearby Wright-Patterson AFB.

August 25, 2009 - 10:08am

Air Fuel Synthesis (AFS), a UK- based company founded by a small group of scientists and engineers, is reaching out to the aviation industry in the hopes of marketing a carbon-neutral jet fuel made from carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

October 6, 2008 - 2:05pm

Peter Diamandis, of X Prize Foundation renown, guest speaker at the Dassault breakfast yesterday and writer of the headline above, is turning his attention to the challenge of developing jet fuels that are “good for the upper atmosphere, fuels that can recycle CO2 in the atmosphere.” The research centers on creating cells capable of absorbing CO2 and converting it into something usable as an energy source.

October 11, 2006 - 8:43am

A world without oil is a breeding ground for alarmists, some say, blithely confident that it can’t run out and “we’ll find more,” but if it ever does run out “we’ll have found something else by then.”

 
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