Environment

October 17, 2013 - 3:27pm

The European Commission is proposing amendments to its existing emissions trading scheme (EU-ETS) that would confirm the continued exemption from the cap-and-trade system for flights outside the airspace of the 28 European Union member states, as well as European economic area states Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.

October 16, 2013 - 12:20pm

The Pilatus PC-12/47E is the subject of a new FAA Airworthiness Directive that describes the unsafe condition as common grounding of both the pilot primary flight display (PFD) and the electronic standby instrument system (ESIS). If the common ground fails, both navigation systems could fail simultaneously, which could result in loss of control.

October 15, 2013 - 2:55pm

Landmark Aviation will hold a groundbreaking ceremony on Thursday for its new facility at San Diego International Airport. Its FBO campus at the Southern California airfield will include a 20,000-sq-ft terminal, 250,000-sq-ft ramp and five hangars on 12.4 acres. The new facility is also expected to achieve Leed Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. According to Landmark, the new FBO will open late next year.

October 15, 2013 - 2:30pm

On Friday, Rockwell Collins unveiled its new EVS-3000 enhanced vision system, which includes a multi-spectral EVS sensor that “significantly improves detection of outside terrain, hazards and obstacles in low-visibility conditions caused by weather phenomena such as fog.” The EVS-3000 also brings the industry-first ability to fully detect LED lighting, which is increasingly being used by airports as a runway lighting solution. It does not require a built-in cooling system, reducing weight.

October 9, 2013 - 10:10am

Greenpoint Aerospace has acquired Jet Works Air Center, a business aircraft completion, refurbishment and MRO facility at Denton (Texas) Municipal Airport. Greenpoint plans to perform interior refurbishment and executive completion work, exterior paint, avionics repair and installation and MRO work at the new location. .

October 8, 2013 - 3:05pm

NBAA, GAMA and other aviation alphabet groups are backing the general principles of an aircraft-emissions policy accepted by 185 ICAO member states on Friday at a triennial meeting in Montreal. These principles are now being handed over to ICAO working groups, whose work product will be proposed for adoption in 2016 at the next triennial meeting. If adopted, the resulting document would be implemented in 2020.

October 7, 2013 - 3:25pm

Opponents of Europe’s emissions trading scheme (ETS) seemed to have gotten the best of a deal reached at the general assembly of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) that should lead to a global market-based mechanism (MBM) for curbing aircraft emissions by 2020. On October 4, the assembly endorsed a plan agreed late the previous day by ICAO’s executive committee calling for a detailed plan for the cap-and-trade MBM to be agreed at the UN body’s next general assembly ahead of full implementation in 2020.

October 7, 2013 - 12:40pm

The Air Traffic Controllers European Unions Coordination (ATCEUC), representing some 14,000 controllers in the region, said it has called off a planned October 10 strike over safety issues tied to the Single European Sky program. The group said it had received assurances that the European Union is willing to discuss those safety issues before implementation.

October 4, 2013 - 12:20am

All aviation eyes were turned toward Montreal early this month as the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) tries to get its arms around a worldwide plan to control jet aircraft emissions.

The big question is whether ICAO’s 191 member states can agree on a plan to curb emissions to the satisfaction of the European Union (EU), which has unilaterally crafted its own emissions trading scheme (ETS) that would capture not only EU aircraft, but also airplanes flying into, out of and through the 28 EU member states.

October 1, 2013 - 12:35am
Once statistically insignificant, birdstrikes now account for more than two strikes per 10,000 movements, and are becoming even more frequent.

Wilbur Wright was the first pilot to record a bird strike (in 1905), and the first fatal crash attributable to a bird strike came seven years later. But to most members of the non-flying public, the first time aircraft bird strikes became newsworthy was probably in 2009, when a flock of Canada geese sent Chesley Sullenberger’s A320 into the Hudson River.

 
X