ETOPS

July 12, 2014 - 9:00am
R-R claims the Trent XWB’s advanced compressor aerodynamics deliver module weight savings of 15 percent through blisk technology.

Rolls-Royce is confident that other customers will take up the 70 Airbus A350-900XWB and -1000XWB production positions released when Emirates Airline canceled its order on June 1, and says demand remains strong for the new twin-aisle twinjet, which is powered exclusively by R-R Trent XWB engines. The loss reduced the manufacturer’s orderbook by £2.6 billion (excluding the value of “TotalCare” support contracts), or about 3.5 percent.

June 20, 2014 - 9:07am

The fifth and final Airbus A350-900 flight-test article took to the skies for the first time Friday, marking the start of the last phase of the 2,500-hour certification program. The second passenger cabin-equipped A350, MSN005 embodies the “operationally definitive” configuration for flight test duties, said Airbus. Plans call for it to perform route proving and ETOPS validation ahead of certification in the third quarter of this year and first delivery to launch customer Qatar Airways in the fourth quarter.

June 16, 2014 - 10:00am

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) each granted the Boeing 787-9 an amended type certificate, paving the way for Air New Zealand to take delivery of the first production example early this summer, Boeing announced on Monday morning. The FAA also has granted Boeing an amended production certificate, validating that the Boeing production system can produce 787-9s that conform to the design. EASA accepts FAA oversight of Boeing production certificates, just as the FAA accepts EASA oversight of European manufacturers’ production certificates.

May 28, 2014 - 2:57pm

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday increased the limits of Boeing 787 extended twin-engine operations (ETOPS) from 180 to 330 minutes, Boeing announced on Wednesday. The approval allows the Dreamliner to operate as far as 330 minutes away from a diversion airfield, thereby allowing for more direct routes between long-range city pairs, particularly over the Pacific Ocean.

May 21, 2014 - 6:30am

Fly Comlux has added an Airbus ACJ318 to its managed fleet. The aircraft was previously managed by another operator but is now part of the Comlux stable in the Middle East. It is operated purely for its owner and will not be available for charter.

May 20, 2014 - 2:15pm

Slovenia-based charter management company Elit’Avia (Booth 5134) announced on the eve of EBACE 2014 that it had received approval from the Slovenian Civil Aviation Agency for extended range operations (EROPS) for its Bombardier Global 6000 and Challenger 605. EROPS approval allows aircraft to fly flight paths that provide three-hour access over water using one engine to a suitable alternate airport.

May 20, 2014 - 1:55pm

Slovenia-based charter management company Elit’Avia received approval from the Slovenian Civil Aviation Agency for extended-range operations (EROPS) for its Bombardier Global 6000 and Challenger 605. EROPS approval allows aircraft to fly routes that provide three-hour access over water using one engine to a suitable alternate airport, twice that for extended-range twin-engine operation performance standard (ETOPS) regulations. This allows for more direct routings.

May 19, 2014 - 3:00am

Comlux has increased its managed fleet to 19 jets with the addition of an Airbus ACJ318. The aircraft is based in the Middle East and will be operated by a European crew entirely for the private use of its undisclosed owner.

According to the group’s president and CEO, Richard Gaona, Comlux’s approval to operate under ETOPS 180 extended-range-over-water rules and conduct Cat IIIB approaches has been a key differentiator from rival management companies. For Airbus aircraft alone, the company has logged more than 12,000 flight hours over the past six years.

May 8, 2014 - 11:23am

Boeing likes to refer to “discipline” when it describes the approach it has taken with the 787-9, discipline in defining the firm configuration of the airplane and discipline related to the program’s engineering plan.

February 9, 2014 - 6:40pm
By January, Rolls-Royce had completed some 6,000 hours and 11,250 real and simulated flight-cycles of running with 13 development examples of the Trent XWB-84 that powers the new Airbus A350-900 twin-aisle twinjet. Two of the engines were being used for cyclic tests at Rolls-Royce North America’s Outdoor Jet Engine Test Facility at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

Ahead of an initial engine run in the second quarter of this year, Rolls-Royce (Booth N23) has started to assemble the 97,000-pound thrust Trent XWB-97 powerplant that will power the heavier, 308-metric-ton (680,000-pound) max takeoff weight Airbus A350-1000 stretch variant of the new twin-aisle twinjet that has been flying since last June. The first items for the powerplant were arriving in the Rolls-Royce (RR) finished parts stores during January, according to program director Chris Young.

 
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