Flameout

February 8, 2008 - 11:09am

Hawker Beechcraft Beechjet 400A, Sarasota, Fla., July 12, 2004–According to the NTSB, the double engine flameout of the Flight Options Beechjet was caused by high-altitude ice crystals that accreted on the compressor vanes and were ingested into the high-pressure compressor when the power levers were retarded, causing compressor surges and flameouts.

February 8, 2008 - 11:09am

Hawker Beechcraft Beechjet 400A, Sarasota, Fla., July 12, 2004–According to the NTSB, the double engine flameout of the Flight Options Beechjet was caused by high-altitude ice crystals that accreted on the compressor vanes and were ingested into the high-pressure compressor when the power levers were retarded, causing compressor surges and flameouts.

September 27, 2007 - 6:40am

Bombardier Learjet 25, St. Augustine, Fla., July 21, 2007–An SK Logistics Learjet 25 was substantially damaged by a hard landing after a dual engine flameout on approach to St. Augustine Airport. As the first officer reduced power on approach, both engines quit. The captain tried unsuccessfully to restart the engines and landed the jet. The 4,620-hour ATP pilot and the 2,453-hour commercial first officer were not injured.

September 26, 2007 - 11:26am

The Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorological Service and Supporting Research, in conjunction with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,

September 20, 2007 - 12:20pm

The NTSB this week finally released initial factual information about the Flight Options Beechjet 400A that experienced a dual engine flameout on Nov. 28, 2005. Both of the airplane’s Pratt & Whitney Canada JT15D-5 turbofans, which had been inspected 31 hours earlier, failed on a positioning flight to Marcos Island, Fla., when power was reduced after the fractional jet was cleared to descend to FL330 from FL380.

May 1, 2007 - 7:24am

Bell 206L-1 LongRanger, Patterson, La., March 14, 2006–The LongRanger’s loss of power during cruise, the NTSB said, was due to the improper installation of an engine fuel line fitting by maintenance personnel, which resulted in a loose fitting. The NTSB listed a tailwind and the lack of a suitable site for a forced landing as factors.

April 4, 2007 - 12:35pm

The simultaneous dual flameout of a Garuda Indonesia Airlines 737 and its subsequent ditching on Jan. 16, 2002, has led the NTSB to issue two recommendations targeting FAA turbofan rain and hail ingestion engine certification standards. The CFM56-3-B1 engines failed when the aircraft flew through a thunderstorm and encountered “extremely heavy” precipitation and hail on the approach.

February 16, 2007 - 6:18am

A University of North Dakota (UND) Citation II research jet made an emergency landing near Beaver, Alaska, on September 30 after both engines flamed out at 9,200 feet msl in clouds. Unable to accomplish an airstart, pilot Paul DeHardy “maneuvered the aircraft to a successful emergency landing 70 miles north of Fairbanks, Alaska.” None of the four crewmembers, one of whom is a researcher with Sikorsky Aircraft, sustained injuries.

January 31, 2007 - 4:03am

A leak in the fuel control unit pneumatic system caused the P&WC PT6 to fail in a Pilatus PC-12 on December 14, according to Pilatus (see AIN, January, page 46). The pilot was able to deadstick the turboprop single to a safe landing on a street in South Bend, Ind. Pilatus re-issued a service letter to remind PC-12 operators that there is a manual override procedure that enables full power to be restored if the fuel control unit fails.

January 29, 2007 - 10:56am

According to the NTSB, the Flight Options Beechjet 400A (N455CW) that experienced a dual flameout over the Gulf of Mexico on July 12 last year had a lower-than-normal amount of anti-icing additives in its tanks. Both Pratt & Whitney Canada JT15D turbofans failed as the twinjet was descending through 39,000 feet about 100 miles off Florida’s west coast.

 
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