Flight Standards District Office

October 6, 2014 - 2:50pm

Details of an FAA investigation released last week uncovered enough evidence to conclude that the competency of any airmen examined by designated pilot examiner (DPE) Bruce Kalashian in the agency’s Fresno, Calif., flight standards district office (FSDO) between January 2012 and January 2014 should be considered in doubt. “As a result of the evidence obtained during the investigation, the FAA has determined that these airmen will require reexamination of their competency pursuant with 49 U.S.C.

July 30, 2014 - 3:30pm

The Tampa Bay Aviation Association (TBAA) has set September 18 as its 4th Annual Safety Day. Daniel Slapo, chairman of TBAA’s Safety Committee, told AIN, “We’re averaging from 80 to 120 people every year, depending upon the topics. We partner with our local aviation authorities from St. Petersburg Clearwater Airport and Tampa International Hillsborough Airport Authority. We talk with them about our goals as an association, come up with a list of topics then ask our members who they recommend we get as speakers. This year’s program will be covering maintenance issues.” St.

July 4, 2014 - 2:10am

The FAA’s Flight Standards District Offices (FSDOs) have a backlog of applications for certificates that concerns the Department of Transportation Inspector General’s Office. As of last October, 1,029 new air operator, flight school and repair station applicants awaited certificates from FSDOs across all eight FAA regions, with 138 applications delayed longer than three years, the IG reported to Congress on June 12.

March 17, 2014 - 9:50am

The FAA future flight technologies branch approved Air Crew Academy’s automatic dependent surveillance broadcast (ADS-B) online training module last week. Previously, individual operators were required to submit the academy’s ADS-B training module to their local FSDO case-by-case to obtain a letter of authorization (LOA). The ADS-B module covers operating procedures, flight planning, MEL procedures, human-factors considerations, ADS-B phraseology, normal and abnormal system operation, aircraft IDs, data source errors and incident reporting.

October 8, 2013 - 3:12pm

As the U.S. government shutdown enters its eighth day, the FAA announced this morning that it is recalling 800 employees from its office of aviation safety this week to provide oversight across the country. These recalls are part of a contingency plan that would see up to 2,500 employees recalled over a two-week period, but only if their positions provide for “the protection of life and property.”

December 24, 2012 - 2:55pm

A revised FAA Notice 8900.196 has been published to provide inspectors with information on de-icing fluid holdover times, as well as a list of the fluids themselves and recommendations on various other ground deicing/anti-icing issues. While the primary audience is flight standards district office (FSDO) principal operations inspectors responsible for air carrier de-icing programs, it is also of value to FSDO personnel and aircraft operators.

December 3, 2012 - 5:15am

Charter operators are facing a costly training issue that could see pilots and fleets grounded unless a solution is found. According to operators, FAA inspectors are requiring strict compliance with an interpretation of the regulations that cover qualifications of instructors and check airmen. The result will be a lack of qualified instructors and check airmen employed by flight training organizations.

April 27, 2010 - 3:52pm

In a five-page response to the FAA’s April 23 emergency order to suspend Darby Aviation’s Part 135 charter certificate, the company’s lawyers–Anderson and Weidner of Birmingham, Ala.–maintain that the action is “frivolous and designed to harass.” According to the letter, “Particular individuals at the Birmingham FSDO have conspired to put Darby Aviation out of business.

November 2, 2009 - 4:48am

A recent survey conducted by the National Air Transportation Association (NATA) about inconsistent FAA regulatory interpretations has yielded “troubling, yet expected,” results. NATA conducted the survey in response to numerous members’ reports of having experienced varying interpretations of FARs by the FAA’s regional aircraft certification (ACO) and flight standards district offices (FSDO).

October 8, 2009 - 2:26pm

A recent survey conducted by the National Air Transportation Association (NATA) about inconsistent FAA regulatory interpretations has yielded “troubling, yet expected,” results. “This survey clearly demonstrates the high unnecessary costs, delays and obstacles aviation businesses suffer due to the FAA’s inconsistent interpretation of the federal aviation regulations,” said NATA president James Coyne.

 
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