Gas turbines

March 15, 2007 - 7:39am

Few sounds are louder than a jet aircraft at takeoff.

The decibel level of a climbing jet engine at full power can be higher (140 dB) than that of a chain saw (110 dB) or ambulance siren (120 dB), according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

But relief may be a toggle away, if recent university research finds its way into aircraft cockpits.

February 21, 2007 - 3:40am

The FAA issued an emergency AD on Friday to all owners and operators of GE CF34-3A1, -3B and -3B1 turbofans after NTSB investigators found an electrical arc-out defect in the fan disk of the engine that broke apart on a Mesa Airlines Bombardier CRJ200 during a revenue flight on January 25.

February 13, 2007 - 10:07am

Shipments of general aviation aircraft last year increased significantly over 2005, resulting in another record high in billings and an all-time high in business jet deliveries.

February 1, 2007 - 5:23am

Starting with the new Challenger 300 powerplant, Honeywell will designate all future turbine engines with letters to identify the type of propulsion, such as HTF for a Honeywell turbofan, HTP for a turboprop and HTS for a turboshaft. Previously, the powerplant in the Challenger 300 was designated the AS907 (where AS stood for AlliedSignal–the company that bought Honeywell in late 1999 and adopted the Honeywell name).

January 30, 2007 - 11:09am

One of the technologies that Honeywell says promises to revolutionize aircraft design is something known as “more electric architecture” (MEA). This “breakthrough” technology will replace much of today’s heavy and maintenance-intensive pneumatic and hydraulic fluid and power systems, enabling OEMs to design aircraft with lighter, simpler and more reliable “electric” systems instead of miles of tubing, pumps and valves.

January 29, 2007 - 6:37am

A former employee of GE Aircraft Engines claims the company knowingly shipped defective parts built during a 10-year period at its factory in Madisonville, Ky. The charges came to light in a $64.4 million “whisteblower” lawsuit filed by former quality-control engineer Terri Brown, unsealed in late November at the request of the Courier-Journal of Louisville.

January 11, 2007 - 6:19am

Spokane, Wash.-based Rocket Engineering is developing the Turbine P/Baron in parallel with the Royal Turbine Duke program. The Baron conversion, which fits two PT6A-21 turboprops and Hartzell four-blade full-feathering-reversing metal props to the light twin, costs about $700,000 (airframe additional). The company plans to have an STC in about 12 to 18 months.

January 11, 2007 - 6:03am

Last year the U.S. business jet fleet experienced fewer fatalities compared with 2004, according to aviation safety analyst Robert E. Breiling Associates of Boca Raton, Fla. However, the Part 91 corporate/executive segment’s previous two-year nonfatal streak came to an end early in 2005 with the crash of a Circuit City Citation 560 on February 16 last year. That accident took the lives of both pilots and the six passengers.

January 8, 2007 - 6:11am

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America (MHIA), the Addison, Texas-based subsidiary of the Japanese company that built the MU-2 turboprop twin, has acquired Intercontinental Jet of Tulsa, Okla. The company, which already provides support for about 50 percent of the 400-strong MU-2 fleet, will become MHIA’s first factory-owned service center. There are also five factory-authorized service facilities in the U.S.

December 18, 2006 - 5:26am

Engine manufacturers are showing renewed interest in the 10,000-pound-thrust segment. They see the aging of the General Electric (GE) CF34-3B, the only engine in production in the class, and at least two companies–Snecma and Pratt & Whitney Canada–are eyeing future large business jets, the size of the Bombardier Challenger 600 series, as potential applications. Meanwhile, GE is modernizing the CF34-1 for the Challenger 601.

 
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