Globalstar

September 22, 2014 - 12:03pm
Iridium Next satellite

Satellite-based surveillance developer Aireon will provide a free emergency tracking system for aircraft when the satellite constellation it will use is launched and operating, as expected, in 2017. Aireon announced the service on September 22, saying the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 earlier this year makes global emergency tracking “essential.”

Aireon’s surveillance system will use automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) receivers contained as hosted payloads on new Iridium Next satellites to send position reports to subscribing air navigation service providers over oceanic and remote regions of the Earth beyond radar coverage. Iridium plans to launch the second-generation constellation of 66 low-Earth-orbit satellites between 2015 and 2017.

The Aireon Aircraft Locating and Emergency Response Tracking service, branded as “Aireon Alert,” will be provided “as a public service to the aviation community, free of charge,” the company said. Operating from a 24-hour emergency call center, it will provide authorized search-and-rescue organizations with the location and last flight track of any 1090-MHz ADS-B transponder-equipped aircraft flying in airspace without other surveillance. Airlines will not have to equip with new avionics.

“The existing gaps in surveillance, particularly in cases of lost aircraft, became abundantly clear this past year,” said John Crichton, president and CEO of Nav Canada, an Aireon joint-venture partner. “The tragic disappearance of Flight MH370 prompted worldwide urgency to look for solutions. Aireon’s response amounts to a global public service, offering Aireon Alert universally with no fee.”

Aireon is a joint venture of Iridium Communications and ANSPs Nav Canada, Italy’s ENAV, the Irish Aviation Authority and Denmark’s Naviair. Nav Canada will acquire a 51-percent interest in the venture by late 2017.

A competing ADS-B-based surveillance system is also progressing. Earlier this month, ADS-B Technologies and satellite communications provider Globalstar announced the completion of the latest flight demonstration of its space-based ADS-B Link Augmentation System (ALAS), tracking a round-trip flight between Alaska and the Gulf of Mexico. The test “marked the first time that a flight demonstration tested a dual-link (1090 MHz and Universal Access Transceiver) space-based ADS-B system in all environments and for extended periods of time,” the companies said. “The flight proved that the 1090ES and UAT versions of the ALAS technology work continuously, reporting the aircraft’s position every second during a flight of nearly 7,000 miles.”

June 30, 2008 - 10:08am

Deliveries of the first RCOM-100 satphone equipment, designed for use with the Globalstar Satellite system, will begin this November, Arnav Systems announced at NBAA 2002. As detailed at the Puyallup, Wash. company’s exhibit (Booth No.

May 29, 2008 - 8:18am

Wireless communications company Qualcomm last month put on an impressive demonstration of its medium data rate satcom system (MDSS) on the show floor at NBAA in New Orleans. The system used a 128-kbps satellite connection to the Internet to uplink live video and audio from Qualcomm’s exhibit-floor display to a company Challenger 604 flying over San Diego.

May 27, 2008 - 6:46am

Neither company has a product that it intends to put on the market anytime soon, but both Qualcomm and Globalstar are demonstrating a satellite-based airborne Internet link for business jets aboard Qualcomm’s Challenger 601. Both companies one day hope to market such a system, which would provide airborne Internet data connections to aircraft cabins and cockpits at speeds of 128 kbps or higher.

May 27, 2008 - 6:35am

The first commercially available airborne Internet link for business jets has arrived in the form of Swift64, a global satcom data service from Inmarsat designed to rival the data transfer rates of ground-based ISDN connections.

May 21, 2008 - 9:48am

A maxim of modern commerce states that the key to success in business lies in always staying a step or two ahead of the competition. Among business aircraft makers that means constantly making improvements to products, sometimes by starting from scratch with an entirely new aircraft, or at other times by making changes to current designs.

May 9, 2008 - 5:33am

Some three months after an enthusiastic announcement, cabin-entertainment specialist Airshow of Tustin, Calif., and low-cost satellite data provider GlobalStar have halted development of high-speed airborne Internet services in light of GlobalStar’s increasingly desperate financial situation.

January 14, 2008 - 10:40am

Northern Airborne Technology, a British Columbia-based subsidiary of the Chelton Group, last month introduced a lightweight satcom system that routes calls through the Globalstar network of 48 low-earth-orbit satellites. The system consists of the STX100 transceiver, PTA12 dialer/adapter and a Globalstar antenna, and provides coverage over about 80 percent of the earth, including polar regions and some mid-oceanic regions.

December 31, 1969 - 1:45pm

Three new air navigation service providers (ANSPs) have agreed to invest in the future Aireon satellite-based air traffic surveillance system, joining anchor investors Nav Canada and Iridium Communications. Italy’s ENAV, the Irish Aviation Authority and Denmark’s Naviair will together invest $120 million in the system, Aireon announced in December.

 
X