Incandescent light bulb

May 22, 2014 - 5:00am

Everett, Washington-based BLR Aerospace (Booth 2606) has obtained FAA approval of its LED lighting system for installation in Beechcraft King Air 90s that are equipped with BLR winglets, the company announced at EBACE 2014. Benefits of LEDs (light-emitting diodes) include better reliability, lower power consumption, higher illumination, reduced weight and longer life, when compared to incandescent lighting.

November 27, 2013 - 9:20am

Along with illuminating the runway surface for takeoffs and landings, landing lights are important tools for achieving maximum conspicuity–making yourself easily visible to nearby traffic–especially in terminal and high-density traffic areas. Twin Commander Aircraft is offering a kit to upgrade the twin turboprop’s existing landing lights to new high-intensity discharge (HID) lights.

October 24, 2013 - 7:00pm

First-time NBAA exhibitor Specialty Bulb Co. (Booth No. C12639) is small compared to most of its neighbors on the convention center floor, but its size belies its significance. While the Bohemia, N.Y. company, located across the street from MacArthur Airport on Long Island, has only 12 employees and just sells one product, lighting, it does this for everything from Cessna 152s to Airbus A320s and Boeing 747s, to a diverse range of customers from weekend pilots to major airlines.

October 30, 2012 - 8:40am
Lumatech LED caution/warning panels

Luma Technologies (Booth No. 3675) has received FAA parts manufacturer approval for its Lumatech LED caution/warning panels available for most recent models of King Airs fitted with classic, Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 and Garmin G1000 avionics. The units cost is between $14,000 and $20,000, according to Luma president Bruce Maxwell.

July 5, 2012 - 12:35am

For King Air G1000 upgraders, a new option is replacement of the old-style incandescent-lighted caution warning panels with a Luma Technologies LED-based panel. Luma and its sister company Advanced Quality Certifications Group received FAA supplemental type certification for the LED panels on the King Air 200, 300, 350 and 350i in May. The company is adding an STC for the C90 in the first quarter of next year. For the King Air line, airplanes that qualify for the LED panels include those with classic avionics, Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 and the recently certified Garmin G1000 upgrades.

April 5, 2012 - 8:00am
Aircraft Lighting International's LED reading light replacement.

Last week, I walked through my local grocery and happened to come across the displays of new light bulbs. You know, the ones with the odd shapes and higher prices. The ones that our government has determined to be more environmentally correct.

January 18, 2012 - 1:45pm

The FAA granted TSO approval for LED position and anti-collision lights manufactured by AeroLEDs. The approval means that the AeroLEDs position and nav lights are qualified for installation on all certified aircraft for which they are compatible. The company’s Pulsar NSP nav/strobe/position light, Pulsar N/S nav/strobe and SunTail tail strobe use LED lights with a life expectancy of 50,000 hours and no external power supply. Pilots can comfortably fly with the AeroLEDs lights switched on without worrying about the shorter lifetime of Xenon or incandescent bulbs.

December 13, 2011 - 2:40am
LED replacement bulb

Aircraft Lighting International has introduced an LED reading light bulb that is a direct replacement for 28V DC/AC miniature incandescent halogen lamps.

According to Nick Michelinakis, owner of the Mount Sinai, N.Y.-based company, “absolutely no changes or modifications to the reading light fixtures are necessary.” Other advantages include lower power draw, virtually no heat generation and a five-year warranty.

October 13, 2010 - 11:32am

Astronics, a provider of advanced, high-performance lighting and electronics systems for the global aerospace industry, has announced a new line of LED landing and taxi lights that consume much less power than the incandescent lights that they replace.

August 25, 2010 - 11:16am

Changes to the FAR Part 21 manufacturing rule published last October 16 are slated to go into effect on April 16 next year, including a modification to the standards for manufacturing. Currently, only parts specifically manufactured for installation in type-certified aircraft are regulated by the FAA, but the changes would expand the parts covered.

 
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