Lift–induced drag

October 27, 2010 - 9:12am

Cessna has selected Winglet Technology’s elliptical winglet for the new Citation Ten. The winglet was jointly developed and certified by Winglet Technology and Cessna Aircraft during a collaborative STC project. Winglet Technology initially received FAA approval of the STC permitting installation of the elliptical winglets on the Citation X in June last year.

November 24, 2009 - 7:52am

Since Winglet Technology received STC approval from the FAA for installation of its distinctive elliptical winglets last June, the company says five retrofit kits have been installed on Cessna Citation Xs at Cessna’s Wichita Citation Service Center. Recently the company has also gotten the OK from Transport Canada, ANAC (Brazil) and is currently pursuing EASA and Australian approval.

May 26, 2009 - 1:32pm

Dassault received EASA certification for its Falcon 2000LX on April 23, followed by FAA certification seven days later. Initially slated for certification more than one year ago, the 2000LX is a winglet-equipped version of the 2000EX. According to the French manufacturer, the winglets cut drag by 5 percent and boost range at Mach 0.80 to 4,000 nm from 3,800 nm. The first customer 2000LX was delivered early last month.

March 15, 2007 - 7:51am

A new control surface could reduce induced drag on commercial and business aircraft by up to 14 percent, resulting in fuel savings of more than $400 million per year across the entire U.S. air transport fleet. So claims Utah State University aeronautical engineering professor Warren Phillips, who recently introduced the devices, which he calls “twisterons.”

December 12, 2006 - 11:53am

Conventional winglets have come to be widely used on airliners, whether in the form of the Airbus A320’s wingtip fence or the up-swept devices characteristic of the A330/340 and Boeing 747-400. And if winglets are good, shouldn’t bigger ones be even better? Wingmaker Airbus UK has been investigating their potential.

December 12, 2006 - 11:23am

Winglets increase efficiency by reducing lift-induced drag. They do this by relocating and diminishing the vortex at the wing’s tip, resulting in lower fuel burn, higher cruise speed and longer range.

November 29, 2006 - 10:37am

New wingtip technology that “will raise eyebrows” is being developed by Aviation Partners and may be revealed at the EBACE show this week. Declining to reveal details ahead of time, chief executive Joe Clark told EBACE Convention News a few weeks ago that satisfactory completion of flight testing could permit him to announce the novel wingtip devices here in Geneva. The U.S.

 
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