Mach number

March 23, 2007 - 12:08pm

Mach 1, a Southern California aircraft broker, and two of its principals, Brian Doherty and John Mouyos, plan to appeal a jury’s decision that they are liable for fraud, according to their attorney. A Southern California Superior Court jury recently ordered the defendants to pay more than $30 million in damages to Jet Source, an FBO and aircraft sales firm at McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad, Calif.

February 2, 2007 - 9:48am

Sino Swearingen insists that the 2,500-nm-range SJ30-2 will be certified in the third quarter of this year, despite numerous program delays and the crash of S/N 002 in April 2003 (see page 1). “Three test aircraft–Serial Numbers 003, 004 and 005–are now flying seven days a week, and I’m comfortable that we will achieve FAA approval in the third quarter,” a company spokesman told AIN.

February 1, 2007 - 9:05am

In the year before April 26, 2003, when Sino Swearingen’s number-one SJ30-2 prototype crashed after entering an uncommanded and unrecoverable right roll during high-speed flutter testing, company engineers were attempting to deal with lateral stability issues with the twinjet, according to the NTSB’s recently released factual report on the accident.

December 13, 2006 - 9:20am

A market research study commissioned by Aerion Corp. has confirmed the demand for the Aerion supersonic business jet (SSBJ) concept to the satisfaction of chairman and chief investor Robert Bass, while low-speed wind-tunnel testing of an 8-percent scale model has shown the need for some refinements of the design.

November 8, 2006 - 4:48am

Aviation Partners (Booth No. 876) is expanding its reach in the winglet modification market with new Hi-Mach Super Critical winglets optimized for the high-speed cruise regime. To date, the company’s Blended Winglets have helped operators enjoy lower fuel burn, higher initial climb altitudes and longer range while flying at long-range cruise speeds. The new Hi-Mach winglets have the same effect, but at Mach 0.80 and above.

November 6, 2006 - 10:06am

Gulfstream reported that its Quiet Spike sonic-boom mitigator successfully achieved supersonic flight on October 20. The OEM has been flight-testing the structural integrity of its Quiet Spike since mid-July. Mounted on the nose of a NASA F-15B and flown at Mach 1.2, the Quiet Spike operated as designed. It extended to its maximum length of 24 feet and performed as expected during the 1.5-hour test flight.

October 9, 2006 - 4:51am

Supersonic Aerospace International (SAI) of Las Vegas said it continues to work with Lockheed Martin on the Quiet Small Supersonic Transport (QSST), the circa-$80 million, 4,000-nm, 12-passenger, Mach 1.8, no-boom supersonic business jet (SSBJ) it announced at the NBAA Convention last year.

September 13, 2006 - 10:53am

After an initial round of meetings with potential OEM partners on its supersonic business jet (SSBJ), Aerion is refining its business case. To lead this effort Aerion hired James Stewart, former CFO of Bombardier Aerospace, as its CFO.

September 12, 2006 - 11:59am

In Cologne, Germany, the $412 million European Transonic Wind Tunnel (ETW)– a multinational joint venture among France, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK–is gradually increasing its workload. The main feature of the wind tunnel is the use of cold nitrogen to aerodynamically offset the smaller size of the model tested, compared to the actual aircraft.

 
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