Microbiology

October 22, 2014 - 4:00pm

Dr. Moneesh Bhow of MedAire (Booth 3185) made it clear: “Ebola is not passed via airborne transmission. In fact,” he continued, “it is half as infectious, on a measureable scale, as HIV. Transmission can be prevented with commonsense, basic hygienic precautions,” he told AIN at NBAA 2014.

October 16, 2014 - 11:35am

Even in the wake of revelations that two Dallas healthcare workers had contracted Ebola from a Liberian man in their care, the International Air Transport Association has issued no special guidance to its airline members for containing the potential spread of the disease in airplanes. Rather, it relies on the guidance of the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which, according to IATA, it shares with its members.  

October 9, 2014 - 11:20am

The U.S. government will begin screening arriving travelers from West Africa for the Ebola virus at five major airports beginning this weekend. New layers of screening will be conducted at New York JFK International Airport on October 11, followed by Washington-Dulles, Newark Liberty, Chicago O’Hare, and Atlanta international airports, which combined receive 94 percent of travelers from Ebola-affected nations.

August 21, 2014 - 3:15pm

The two U.S. humanitarian aid workers who contracted Ebola while working in Africa and were flown to the U.S. aboard a specially outfitted Phoenix Air Gulfstream III were released after successful treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Nancy Writebol, who worked for ministry SIM International and was flown back on August 5, was discharged yesterday; Dr.

August 13, 2014 - 12:44pm

In moves that appear counter to the advice of the World Health Organization (WHO), Zambia and the Ivory Coast have issued bans on air travel between their territories and three West African countries in which Ebola outbreaks have occurred. Meanwhile, Nigeria has suspended all flights by Gambia Bird Airlines into its airports, citing the carrier’s failure to take sufficient measures to contain the spread of the virus.

June 25, 2014 - 12:05pm

Cessna has released a video on microbiological growth in fuel tanks for all Citations. Microbes can grow wherever water accumulates in aircraft fuel tanks and systems. Only tiny quantities of water are required: a film less than 1mm thick can support microbial growth. The video shows how to inspect fuel tanks for signs of microbiological growth, fungus and possible corrosion damage.

June 7, 2014 - 1:45am

Foodborne illness is a growing concern in the U.S., and one that flight departments and FBOs should take seriously. According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are approximately 48 million cases each year in the U.S., 128,000 of them severe enough to require hospitalization, 3,000 of them fatal. Travel medical services provider MedAire notes that gastrointestinal illness accounts for the largest percentage of calls from its private aviation customers, with 77 percent of them regarding passengers.

April 15, 2013 - 12:50pm

Despite reports that the H7N9 avian flu has been responsible for 10 deaths out of 28 reported cases in China, international medical authorities don’t yet believe the virus is a concern for flight crews or airline passengers traveling to Asia, or at least not enough for the World Health Organization (WHO) to recommend any travel or trade restrictions. All cases have occurred in regions of eastern China–Anhui, Jiangsu and Zhejiang, with 13 in Shanghai. None appears to have been transmitted from person-to-person, only to people who have been in contact with infected poultry.

April 2, 2013 - 5:10am
Paula Kraft, a principal with Aviation Catering Consultants, exhibits an easy smile, but when it comes to food safety, she is “deadly serious.” (Photo: Kirby J. Harrison)

The threat of food-borne illness at 41,000 feet is all too real, and one the business aviation industry takes all too lightly, says Paula Kraft, a principal with Aviation Catering Consultants (ACC) of Atlanta.

According to in-flight medical emergency services specialist MedAire, 60 percent of its calls are related to gastrointestinal illnesses. That number leaves no doubt that food-handling standards should be just as rigorous as those that apply to aircraft maintenance, asserts Kraft.

February 24, 2010 - 5:30am

AAR, an aviation products and services provider, has joined with Cheadle-based Quest International in the UK to develop and distribute Quest’s AirManager, an active air filtration and sterilization system designed to eliminate potentially harmful airborne contaminants. The agreement names AAR an authorized distributor of AirManager.

 
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