NAL Saras

July 15, 2013 - 11:20am

Heightened awareness of the steady growth in regional air traffic among small and medium-sized cities has convinced the Indian government to commit some $2 billion for the development of a 70- to 90-seat civilian aircraft. “This is a strategic sector where there is a need to have a presence in the long term, particularly in view of the rapid growth of our aviation sector.” said Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

February 5, 2013 - 7:27am

India’s bid to design and develop its own indigenous civil aircraft is once again under discussion. According to government sources, a new policy decision is expected on the civil aircraft program by February 12.

February 27, 2011 - 7:45am

As India celebrated the centenary year of commercial aviation last month, the nationπs business aviation sector is poised for exponential growth fueled by the nation's expanding economy.

May 1, 2009 - 12:11pm

National Aerospace Laboratories Saras, Bangalore, India, March 6, 2009–The number-two prototype of the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6-powered Saras crashed on its 49th test flight, killing three test pilots. The Indian National Aerospace Laboratories expects to certify the 14-seat Saras next year.

April 30, 2009 - 11:47am

The number-two prototype Saras twin-turboprop crashed on March 6 in India during its 49th test flight, killing the three test pilots on board. The third prototype of the 14-seat Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6-powered twin is under construction and will be production-conforming. Indian certification of the Saras is expected next year.

March 12, 2009 - 12:12pm

India’s National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) still plans to go ahead with the project to develop the country’s first indigenous airplane despite the March 6 crash of its number-two Saras prototype. “The Saras project will continue; we will not shelve it,” SK Brahmachari, director general of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), told the press yesterday.

September 20, 2007 - 7:33am

Of all the sub-segments of the general aviation market, the turboprop field is the only one not experiencing a marked increase of new development. At airshow after airshow, very light jets, personal single-engine jets, more powerful piston singles and light sport airplanes have garnered the greatest amount of attention.

August 30, 2007 - 7:03am

Of all the subsegments of the general aviation market, the turboprop field is the only one not experiencing an increase in new development. At airshow after airshow, very light jets, personal single-engine jets, more powerful piston singles and light sport airplanes have seen the greatest amount of activity. Although turboprops are one of the most efficient ways to fly, they are not the shining stars of most product development departments.

March 7, 2007 - 11:25am

The Aero India airshow, held last month at its traditional venue of Yelahanka Air Force Station, located just outside the IT and business capital of Bangalore, has traditionally been dominated by military programs and displays rather than the multibillion-dollar signings of civilian sales that are the norm at most other major expositions.

March 5, 2007 - 9:05am

Indian state-owned National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) continue working on a 12-passenger twin-turboprop pusher called the Saras, named after the graceful Indian crane. The first prototype, which made its flying debut at Aero India 2005, has logged 95 flight hours in 40 test flights. Teething problems discovered in the initial phase of flight-testing have been solved, NAL director Dr. A.R.

 
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