Noise regulation

October 3, 2007 - 10:26am

Gulfstream is now delivering the G200 standard with a thermal/acoustic interior, which is said to reduce both aircraft weight and cabin noise levels. The weight saving is at least 150 lb, according to Gulfstream. Acoustical testing is planned for later this month and measured noise is expected to be about 55 dB on the speech-interference-level scale.

October 3, 2007 - 8:13am

The FAA is reviewing proposed noise-compatibility programs submitted for Bradley International Airport, Hartford, Conn., and Reid-Hillview Airport, San Jose, Calif. The agency expects to approve or reject the proposals on or before November 3. Both programs are being submitted under FAR Part 150, and comments on the proposals can be submitted to the FAA. For more information, contact the respective local FAA airports district office.

September 20, 2007 - 10:41am

By the end of next month, TAG Aviation (Booth No. 6238) expects to learn the outcome of what could prove a landmark public inquiry into the growth of business aviation traffic at London-area Farnborough Airport. Hazel Blears, Britain’s secretary of state for communities and local government, is due to rule on TAG’s application to boost the number of movements permitted each year on weekends and holidays from 2,500 to 5,000.

August 7, 2007 - 12:26pm

The FAA last week issued the final environmental impact statement for the New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia airspace redesign, a major project that seeks to reduce delays in and out of the New York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas.

July 31, 2007 - 12:17pm

TAG Aviation has introduced a quiet flying program to reduce noise experienced by neighborhoods around London-area Farnborough Airport. It is running the program, which aims to reduce noise by requiring more accurate flight paths, among other things, on a trial basis between early May and the end of this month. The company intends to have the new arrival and departure procedures formally adopted by the UK Civil Aviation Authority.

April 18, 2007 - 8:40am

All jet and transport-category airplanes (those with an mtow of 12,500 pounds or more) for which application of a new type design is submitted on or after Jan. 1, 2006, will have to meet new noise certification levels. The FAA today issued its final FAR Part 36 Stage 4 noise levels that were originally proposed in December 2003.

April 11, 2007 - 6:44am

A final rule published last Friday harmonizes FAR Part 36 light, propeller-driven airplane noise certification standards with international standards and provides uniform noise certification requirements for airplanes certified in the U.S. and Europe, according to the FAA. This amendment will also simplify airworthiness approvals for import and export purposes, it added.

April 2, 2007 - 10:31am

Manufacturers of newly designed helicopters will have to meet slightly revised U.S. noise standards, effective with applications for new designs or major design changes submitted after June 1. The FAA revised FAR Part 36 to harmonize helicopter noise standards with those of the JAA and ICAO.

March 29, 2007 - 11:51am

A group of airports, local governments and residents has requested that Congress order the complete phase-out of all Stage 1 and Stage 2 aircraft regardless of weight. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) has submitted such legislation.

March 16, 2007 - 10:41am

New designs for small business turboprop singles could be included in proposed changes to FAR Part 36 noise-certification rules. The more stringent levels are aimed primarily at reducing noise from newly designed primary training aircraft, but new turboprop singles certified under Part 23 would also be covered. The FAA said the more stringent requirements are intended to keep limits within the capability of current technology.

 
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