Northeast Airlines Flight 823

May 10, 2010 - 10:26am

Bombardier Learjet 55, Casper, Wyo., March 17, 2009–The flight crew’s failure to follow manufacturer’s emergency procedures for a high-energy stop inspection following a rejected takeoff was to blame for the accident, which damaged the Canadian-registered twinjet after a second takeoff attempt.

May 10, 2010 - 10:26am

Bombardier Learjet 55, Casper, Wyo., March 17, 2009–The flight crew’s failure to follow manufacturer’s emergency procedures for a high-energy stop inspection following a rejected takeoff was to blame for the accident, which damaged the Canadian-registered twinjet after a second takeoff attempt.

August 5, 2008 - 8:45am

LEARJET 25, ITHACA, N.Y., AUG. 24, 2001–The NTSB determined the probable cause of this accident to be the pilot’s failure to maintain a proper climb rate while taking off at night, resulting in spatial disorientation. Additional factors included low visibility and cloud conditions, and the dark night.

May 7, 2008 - 6:14am

Mitsubishi MU-2B-26A, San Antonio, Texas, Jan. 22, 2000–The NTSB’s factual report is now out on the fatal crash of MU-2 N386TM. The twin turboprop was destroyed and both pilots were killed when it crashed immediately after takeoff from the San Antonio International Airport at 1432 CST.

October 10, 2007 - 11:26am

LEARJET 35A, GROTON, CONN., AUG. 4, 2003–The first officer’s inadvertent retraction of the flaps during low-altitude maneuvering caused Learjet N135PT to stall and crash into a house while attempting to land at the Groton/New London Airport, said the NTSB. Factors were the captain’s decision to perform a low-altitude maneuver using excessive bank angle, the flight crew’s inadequate coordination and low clouds surrounding the airport.

October 18, 2006 - 1:58pm

Beech King Air C90A, Salt Lake City, Dec. 18, 2004–The NTSB said the probable cause was the pilot’s failure to obtain/ maintain a proper climb rate after takeoff and his premature initiation of the turn (low-altitude flight maneuver).

September 22, 2006 - 11:53am

Beech King Air 200, Green Bay, Wis., June 30, 2004–The accident was caused by the loss of engine power for an undetermined reason and the pilot’s premature retraction of the landing gear after takeoff, said the Safety Board.

 
X