Occupational safety and health

August 4, 2008 - 7:03am

If you’re the kind of pilot who relishes the moment when you flee the FBO in the crew car for a round of golf or a night on the town, there is a phalanx of insurers and associations that are out to change your lifestyle. The National Air Transportation Association (NATA), NBAA and the Flight Safety Foundation are leading the charge, staunchly backed by insurance companies such as U.S. Aviation Underwriters.

May 29, 2008 - 10:17am

A Flight Safety Foundation publication cites a report from the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center of the U.S. Department of Transportation regarding controllers’ errors in communications. The report says tower controllers need improved memory aids; improved means of communications with pilots; improved means of coordinating actions with colleagues; and improved surveillance and monitoring equipment.

May 15, 2008 - 11:38am

“Targeted guidelines” and “tough enforcement” are two key elements of a comprehensive voluntary plan from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) “to dramatically reduce ergonomic injuries,” according to Labor Secretary Elaine Chao. “This plan is a major improvement over the rejected old rule because it will prevent ergonomics injuries before they occur and reach a much larger number of at-risk workers.”

May 7, 2008 - 7:47am

Knowing what factors contribute to accidents permits operational changes to be made to reduce future risk, according to the UK Civil Aviation Authority, which is encouraging the use of flight-data monitoring (FDM) to make safety-management systems “more effective than traditional means of audit or inspection.” CAA safety regulator James Lyons said, “Repeatable and independent” FDM analysis allows active monitoring and auditing to improve regul

May 6, 2008 - 7:13am

If the CEO of a corporation should suddenly ask the aviation department manager, “What are we doing to ensure the highest level of safety in our flying operations?” that manager should be prepared to outline the elements that constitute the company’s aviation safety program.

May 6, 2008 - 5:10am

Like all high-tech industries, aviation has hardware, software and wetware. The last is a euphemism for the gray matter between a pilot’s ears (or a controller’s, mechanic’s or any other operator’s, for that matter). Over the 10 decades of powered flight, we’ve vastly improved aircraft engines and airframes. In the past two decades or so, computer processors and databases have left their indelible imprint on avionics.

May 5, 2008 - 6:28am

The fractional aircraft industry has been involved in just seven non-fatal accidents since 1986, the year that this segment of aviation is considered to have been created, according to a new study by business aviation safety analyst Robert E. Breiling Associates of Boca Raton, Fla.

April 17, 2008 - 10:16am

The Air Charter Safety Foundation (ACSF) has already reviewed the 2007 preliminary aviation safety statistics released yesterday by the NTSB and found that the data reveals there were no fatal passenger-carrying accidents involving jets flown by on-demand air charter operators or fractional providers.

April 14, 2008 - 7:09am

AIN has learned that Signature Flight Support and Mercury Air Centers have signed a letter of intent for Signature to buy Mercury’s base at Hanscom Field in Bedford, Mass., outside Boston for $15.5 million in cash

March 28, 2008 - 6:25am

The charter industry is shifting to a new way of thinking about safety. “We are going from a compliance-based ‘Do you meet the regulatory standard?’ to ‘What more should we do, how can we be safe, how can we tell the good story of this industry?’ [Charter] is becoming a larger player in the transportation marketplace.

 
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