Piedmont Airlines Flight 22

February 13, 2007 - 3:56am

The NTSB recently concluded its investigations into two King Air fatal accidents, attributing the probable causes to the pilots. IMC was a factor in both accidents. On Jan. 31, 2004, the pilot and his teenage son were killed when their C90 broke up in flight and crashed into the Everglades about 10 minutes after departing Florida Keys Airport.

February 1, 2007 - 10:04am

The NTSB has asked the FAA to limit the number of times a pilot can fail a checkride and questioned whether the existing requirements of providing additional training after multiple failures is adequate. Additionally, the Safety Board wants the FAA to require Part 121 and 135 operators to improve their safety background checks of pilot applicants by obtaining all notices of failed checkrides before making a hiring decision.

January 19, 2007 - 10:55am

The NTSB final report on the May 2005 crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B found several causes, notably the pilot’s mishandling a partial power loss in the left engine due to his lack of recent flight experience and recurrent training. While flight logs provided by the family showed the pilot had more than 500 hours operating an MU-2, his last MU-2 flight before the accident flight was 14 years earlier. Four people were killed in the crash.

October 19, 2006 - 11:22am

NTSB acting chairman Mark Rosenker said the FAA’s airport movement area safety system (AMASS) is not adequate to prevent serious runway collisions, citing several recent near-collisions at Boston and New York airports where AMASS allegedly did not perform. The Safety Board wants a system to provide immediate warnings of probable collisions directly to flight crews.

October 16, 2006 - 1:09pm

The NTSB should be able to choose which general aviation accidents it investigates, former Board member Carol Carmody said in a speech before the Washington Aero Club.

September 25, 2006 - 7:45am

In its January 10 final report on the fatal crash of a Cessna Caravan more than three years ago, the NTSB said there was “no evidence of an in-flight collision or breakup.” The Safety Board modified its factual report, which previously contained language that suggested the possibility of an in-flight collision, perhaps with a nearby FedEx DC-10, before it lost control and crashed on Oct. 23, 2002, killing the sole-occupant pilot.

 
X