Primer

July 9, 2014 - 12:09pm

Sherwin-Williams has introduced chrome hazard-free quick-dry epoxy primer. The company says it is a high-performance, two-component corrosion-inhibitive epoxy primer that contains no chromate, dries more quickly and has a longer pot life than current paints. It provides “excellent adhesion to treated substrates,” meets U.S.

November 17, 2013 - 8:00am

U.S.-based AkzoNobel Aerospace Coatings, a division of International Paints, has reported qualification of one of its base-coat products to the Aerospace Material Specification (AMS) standard, which governs the use of metals for aircraft manufacture and MRO.

April 24, 2013 - 12:50pm

StandardAero’s large transport-category bizliner completions center, Associated Air Center in Dallas has received the state of Texas’ highest award for environmental achievement: the Texas Environmental Excellence Award. AAC received the award for its sustainability initiatives and continuous improvement projects in the reduction and/or elimination of products and processes that use hexavalent chromium as well as the use of LED (light-emitting diode) task lighting within aircraft projects.

October 29, 2012 - 12:20pm

Sherwin-Williams Aerospace Coatings (Booth No. 4547), located in Andover, Kan., introduced several new products during NBAA’12. Its new urethane primer and sanding surfacer (CM0481827) can double as either a traditional sanding surfacer or as a primer. MROs and paint shops can now use one product for two purposes. And the product dries twice as fast as traditional epoxy surfacer technologies. The corrosion-inhibitive urethane primer is also chromate hazard-free and is intended for use on all aircraft.

June 29, 2011 - 3:23am

PPG Industries’ aerospace business has introduced a chromate-free coating that, according to the Pittsburgh-based coatings specialist, “reduces environmental impact, lowers aircraft weight and provides a smooth, glossy and highly durable finish.”

July 28, 2009 - 10:15am

Sherwin-Williams Aerospace Coatings has introduced a full line of primers that are free of chrome and lead hazards. The products meet three key industry requirements–faster priming application, protection of the aircraft substrate and compliance with OSHA standards for chromate and lead exposure.

March 19, 2008 - 5:55am

“When you paint an airplane, seven things happen, and six of them are bad.” So says Frank DeNisio, and he ought to know the potential pitfalls that can come between bare metal and a gleaming, durable paint job. DeNisio is operations manager of modifications for Dassault Falcon Jet Wilmington, the relatively new owner of the paint shop he has worked in for 27 years. Dassault Falcon Jet bought the Wilmington, Del.

March 19, 2008 - 5:52am

There are those unsung workers whose skills are underrated and whose work may go unappreciated, or at best is taken for granted. So it is with those who paint business airplanes. It’s a sometimes nasty, often physically demanding, always labor-intensive job that requires a knowledge of chemistry and the soul of an artist.

September 21, 2006 - 11:46am

Exterior paint has always been a statement. In ancient times, sailors painted eyes on the bows of ships so they might find their way easily. Even today, it is a custom Chinese boat builders still follow. During World War II, “nose art” was common on military aircraft. Perhaps the best known was the Memphis Belle, a B-17 that bore the name and a scantily clad image of the belle herself.

September 14, 2006 - 10:23am

There is no airplane so beautiful that a good paint job won’t help it look even better, maybe a lot better. So says Jim Burress, manager of Landmark Aviation’s paint department in Springfield, Ill., and veteran of more than 28 years in the business.

 
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