Risk

March 27, 2007 - 10:37am

Every few years, a debate erupts about whether the phenomenon of ice bridging is real or something questionable that pilots discuss while hangar flying or warning of the dangers of flying in icing conditions. The issue recently resurfaced at an NTSB public meeting about the icing-related crash of a Cessna Citation 560 in Pueblo, Colo., on Feb. 16, 2005.

March 26, 2007 - 7:24am

Cessna Citation 550, Fort Yukon, Alaska, Sept. 30, 2005–The NTSB has concluded that the University of North Dakota icing research jet accident was caused by the pilot’s improper use of anti-icing equipment during cruise, which resulted in ice ingestion into both engines and the complete loss of power. Factors were the icing conditions, inadequate crew resource management and failure to use a checklist.

March 23, 2007 - 12:38pm

Mitsubishi garnered top bragging rights in the most recent AIN product-support survey, and the biennial pilots’ review of proficiency (PROP) seminar series is one good reason why. How many manufacturers sponsor regular owner/operator safety seminars–let alone doing so for aircraft that went out of production almost two decades ago?

March 12, 2007 - 12:19pm

Annual U.S. turbine helicopter accidents for singles and twins dropped slightly last year, a reflection of an improving safety picture combined with steady, or possibly slightly declining, usage rates compared with 2005. Those were the preliminary opinions of noted business aviation safety expert Bob Breiling of Robert E. Breiling and Associates.

March 9, 2007 - 9:51am

Cessna 550 Citation II, Ft. Yukon, Alaska, Sept. 30, 2005–The captain, copilot and two research scientists were not seriously injured when Citation N77ND made an off-airport, gear-up emergency landing after both engines quit simultaneously. The University of North Dakota flight was doing icing research in IFR conditions when the accident occurred.

March 8, 2007 - 9:38am

The NTSB concluded that the forced landing of a University of North Dakota Citation 550 research jet on Sept. 30, 2005, in Fort Yukon, Alaska, was caused by the pilot’s “improper use of anti-icing,” which resulted in ice ingestion into both engines and the complete loss of power. No one was seriously injured.

March 7, 2007 - 6:05am

During the January 23 public meeting on the icing-related crash of a Cessna Citation 560 near Pueblo, Colo., NTSB members criticized the FAA and Cessna for not updating critical icing information used by pilots and certification engineers.

February 13, 2007 - 5:48am

The NTSB recently released its preliminary report on a Falcon 20 that crashed September 1 during takeoff after encountering numerous birds. After rotating off the runway at Ohio's Lorain County Regional Airport, at an altitude of about 15 feet the USA Jet Airlines jet (N821AA) hit "a flock of birds [coming] from both sides of the runway," which "warmed in front of the aircraft," and birds were ingested into both engines.

February 6, 2007 - 3:59am

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) listed it as merely a serious incident but considered it significant enough to issue a full report. The incident involved the loss of control a Saab 340 experienced when it encountered icing. There were no injuries and no damage to the aircraft, but the pilots did not recover from the loss of control until the aircraft was only 112 feet above the ground.

February 5, 2007 - 5:31am

Meggitt/S-Tec later this year plans to introduce an all-new digital autopilot for twin turboprops and light jets as part of a top-to-bottom revamping of its autopilot product line. The product, as yet unnamed, will be centered on an embedded flight control system and targeted at OEM and retrofit applications with “all the features of a full business jet automatic flight control system,” including the ability to upgrade to autothrottle

 
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