Rulemaking

June 6, 2014 - 2:10am

Within Six Months

July 4, 2014:

Taws Equipage for Canadian Aircraft with Six or More Passenger Seats

May 14, 2014 - 11:05am

The FAA has issued an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to collect information to draft regulations regarding controlled-substance and alcohol testing of Part 145 repair station employees located outside the U.S. To help in the preparation of comments and to gather information about current industry practices, the Aeronautical Repair Station Association (Arsa) is soliciting input via a survey of potentially affected repair stations.

May 7, 2014 - 1:15am

An unintended consequence of the Department of Transportation’s proposed rule banning cellphone use on aircraft could prevent business aviation passengers from using their mobile devices for in-flight voice calling. The DOT’s advanced notice of proposed rulemaking is aimed at calming airline passengers who are concerned that allowing voice calling would make travel even more uncomfortable if they are forced to listen to seatmates’ calls.

April 3, 2014 - 2:40pm

The FAA will begin formal rulemaking to consider whether to allow private pilots to use a driver’s license in lieu of an FAA medical certificate in some circumstances, the agency announced yesterday. The announcement follows a joint petition by AOPA and the Experimental Aircraft Association to the FAA to expand the third-class medical exemption, as well as proposed legislation, the General Aviation Pilot Protection Act (GAPPA), that is currently making its way through both the House and Senate.

April 2, 2014 - 12:25am

Never renowned for its ability to fast-track rulemaking, the FAA might be gunning for a new record.

It has been nearly a decade since the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) introduced an amendment to its aviation rulemaking to require member states to have certified international airports establish a safety management system (SMS). The FAA has said it supports harmonization of international standards and has worked to make U.S. aviation safety regulations consistent with ICAO standards and recommended practices.

February 13, 2014 - 1:40pm

NBAA welcomed passage by the House of Representatives of H.R.3578, which compels the FAA to establish a rulemaking process before implementing any mandatory pilot-screening requirement for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as a condition for getting a medical certificate. In November, the FAA announced a plan to begin requiring OSA screening for pilots with a body mass index of 40 or greater. “The business aviation community thanks lawmakers for passing this measure seeking a fully transparent process for any consideration of OSA screening,” said NBAA president and CEO Ed Bolen.

February 10, 2014 - 1:23pm

The FAA should allow non-military drones access to fly in rural areas now, rather than wait for the agency to complete its broader integration into civil airspace following the rulemaking process, according to the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). Drones are too valuable to be kept on the ground and the agency is moving too slowly in creating applicable safety regulations, said AUVSI president Michael Toscano.

January 20, 2014 - 1:45pm

U.S. Senators Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and James Inhofe (R-Okla.) have introduced legislation–S.1941–to require the FAA to follow the established rulemaking process as the agency tries to implement its obstructive sleep apnea screening rule. Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska), an original cosponsor of the bill, is a member of the Senate general aviation caucus, along with Manchin and Inhofe.

December 5, 2013 - 3:15pm

The House aviation subcommittee cleared legislation yesterday that would force the FAA to follow established rulemaking processes before implementing a new requirement that some pilots be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before receiving a medical certificate. The bill, H.R. 3578, was introduced on November 21 by Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.), chairman of the Transportation Committee’s aviation subcommittee.

November 26, 2013 - 3:20pm

NBAA and AOPA welcomed legislation introduced on Thursday in the U.S. House of Representatives that would require the FAA to go through the rulemaking process before issuing any requirement for some pilots to undergo screening for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before receiving a medical certificate. Earlier this month, Federal Air Surgeon Dr.

 
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