Runway safety area

May 2, 2008 - 11:40am

The City of Santa Monica, Calif., planned to implement its new ordinance prohibiting operation of category C and D aircraft at the city’s airport beginning April 25. The city enacted the ordinance because of “the dramatic increase in the number of faster airplanes using the airport,” according to a statement from the city.

November 20, 2007 - 10:47am

The FAA has issued an advisory circular for pilots and operators of turbine-powered airplanes to identify, understand and mitigate risks associated with runway overruns during landing.

August 29, 2007 - 7:04am

Six professional engineering societies jointly presented the Elmer A. Sperry Award to the developers of the EMAS (engineered material arresting system), which helps prevent injury after runway overruns by stopping aircraft in beds of specially engineered concrete. EMAS beds are typically used where normal runway safety areas are not available due to space constraints.

August 23, 2007 - 10:59am

Six professional engineering societies jointly presented the Elmer A. Sperry Award to the developers of the EMAS (engineered material arresting system), which helps prevent injury after runway overruns by stopping speeding aircraft in beds of specially engineered porous concrete. EMAS beds are typically used where normal runway safety areas are not available due to space constraints.

January 31, 2007 - 9:15am

Ever feel like no matter what you do you just can’t win in the eyes of some
people? I’m not talking about the average aviation enthusiast. I’m talking about the editors and reporters of many of the nation’s news outlets. A number of aviation industry employees and organizations have worked hard to achieve an accident rate for Part 121 that is the lowest in history, but that is often unappreciated.

January 24, 2007 - 9:19am
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The city of Santa Monica, Calif., is proposing to shorten the airport’s runway to accommodate installation of a 250-foot engineered material arresting system (EMAS) at the west end of Runway 3/21. The proposal would also use “declared distances” to obtain safety areas that are not available without shortening the runway.

September 13, 2006 - 5:48am

The FAA has contracted for four additional airports to have engineered materials arresting systems (EMAS) installed on runways that don’t have enough space for 1,000-foot-long runway safety areas. The arresting system uses crushable concrete to slow and stop an airplane that runs off the end of the runway. Fourteen U.S. airports have 18 of the systems installed, and construction of four systems is under way in San Diego; Charleston, W.

September 12, 2006 - 8:17am

A Falcon 900 overran Runway 1 during landing at Greenville Downtown Airport, S.C., on July 17, but was stopped by the Engineered Materials Arresting System (EMAS), preventing possible injuries and damage. The pilot said the brakes did not appear to be as effective as normal. The airplane slowed, overran the runway and was stopped by the EMAS. Fourteen airports currently have the system.

 
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