Safety

January 28, 2013 - 3:00pm

The Walk Out for Safety protest organized by the European Cockpit Association (ECA) was supported by 2,500 to 3,000 pilots and cabin crew across 26 different countries on January 22. The event was intended to express opposition to changes to commercial flight- and duty-time rules proposed by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

January 28, 2013 - 12:16pm

Investigations of separate incidents involving Boeing 787s in the U.S. and Japan appear to concur that the batteries that burned in each case did not overcharge. But investigators continue to seek causes for the two incidents that led to the grounding of the worldwide 787 fleet. The probes remain focused on the eight-cell lithium-ion batteries manufactured by Japan’s GS Yuasa for Thales, which supplies the 787’s electrical power conversion system.

January 24, 2013 - 6:55pm
787 battery examined in NTSB Materials Lab

The damaged lithium-ion APU battery from the Japan Air Lines Boeing 787 that caught fire on January 7 while parked at Boston’s Logan Airport experienced an uncontrolled chemical reaction known as a “thermal runway” and short circuiting, but the cause and sequence of these events are still unknown, according to the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

January 21, 2013 - 2:35pm

Since October last year there have been 132 incidents involving battery overheats or fires aboard aircraft, according to the FAA. Until the recent series of Boeing 787 incidents, most fires occurred in cargo containers or personal electronic devices carried in the cabin.

January 21, 2013 - 2:18pm

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Office of Inspector General (IG) issued a self-initiated report on Dec. 19, 2012, about the FAA’s en route automation modernization (Eram) program’s (flight) information security controls. Unfortunately, the IG did not make the report public online due to security requirements to protect the information crews might care about.

January 17, 2013 - 3:40pm

Aviation alphabet groups praised the appointment of Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ) to serve as the new chairman of the aviation subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure during the 113th Congress. The subcommittee has jurisdiction over civil aviation in the U.S., including most aspects of the FAA, TSA and NTSB.

January 17, 2013 - 3:10pm

TAG Aviation has introduced a new measure to manage noise at the UK’s Farnborough Airport. Since January 1, jet aircraft that do not meet the ICAO Chapter/Stage IV standard have been banned from using the airport. This noise standard is ICAO’s most stringent and quietest classification for jet aircraft. To ensure compliance, TAG requires approved noise certificates before permission can be granted to land or take off at the airport. Approximately 300 movements last year would not meet the new standard, it said.

December 24, 2012 - 3:25pm

According to the European Cockpit Association (ECA), pilots in the region are pleased about the European Commission’s December 19 announcement of a new accident/incident occurrence reporting system.

December 17, 2012 - 2:40pm

The FAA’s new order VS8000.367A–which aims to establish an SMS at the agency’s AVS (aviation safety) branch–defines the requirements for safety management systems (SMS) and is considered by the agency to be a comprehensive top-down resource for managing its risk programs. “The FAA is implementing an SMS to integrate the management of safety risk into business planning, operations and decision making to enhance safety for the flying public as well as strengthen the agency’s leadership role in the field,” said the order.

December 10, 2012 - 2:21pm

One provision of the Congressional FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 required the FAA to develop a policy under which the requirements of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration could apply to cabin crewmembers. The FAA’s aviation safety regulations always take precedence, but OSHA might be able to enforce certain occupational safety and health standards currently not covered by FAA oversight.

 
X