Stall

October 22, 2014 - 12:30pm

The comment deadline has been extended 90 days, from October 8 to January 6, on anotice of proposed rulemaking(NPRM) published in July that seeks to amend qualification standards for some flight simulation training devices (FSTDs), specifically those capable of reproducing extended flight envelope and adverse weather training.

October 20, 2014 - 12:50pm

Genesys Aerosystems is offering details about its HeliSAS helicopter stability augmentation system (HeliSas) and autopilot at Booth 3334. The latest HeliSas recently received an FAA supplemental type certificate (STC) for installation in the Airbus Helicopters EC130T2.

The STC expands Genesys’s range of autopilot certifications for Eurocopter, Bell and Robinson helicopters, according to the Mineral Wells, Tex.-based company, which purchased Cobham Avionics units S-Tec and Chelton Flight Systems in April in a management-led buyout.

September 9, 2014 - 2:55pm

Quest Aircraft received FAA approval to install the Garmin GFC 700 autopilot into its Kodiak turboprop single. The GFC 700–which provides flight director, autopilot, yaw damper, automatic and manual electric trim capabilities–integrates with the Kodiak’s G1000 avionics system. Standard features of the GFC 700 include electronic stability protection, which prevents the airplane from decelerating below established minimum airspeeds and allows for coupled go-arounds. Deliveries of Kodiaks equipped with the Garmin GFC 700 will begin in the fourth quarter.

July 27, 2014 - 1:00pm
SafeFlight AoA sensor

Safe Flight invented the stall warning horn in 1946, and refined the concept with its “lift transducer” beginning in 1953. Now the company is at EAA AirVenture 2014 with a new product–the SCx Leading Edge AoA (angle of attack) indicator. It’s priced to be competitive with other AoA indicators, especially considering its $200 show discount. AirVenture buyers will pay $1,295 when they buy a system at the Safe Flight booth (No. 18). The regular price is still-attractive at $1,495.

July 21, 2014 - 1:50pm

The pilot of an MBB-Kawasaki (Eurocopter) BK117B2 flying a trauma recovery mission at 5,000 feet agl in South Australia last year saw a number of hydraulic fluctuations on the helicopter’s system indicators just before the aircraft experienced an uncommanded and violent pitch up. That excursion was followed closely by a left roll and descent, according to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).

July 14, 2014 - 1:43pm

The Dutch government’s safety board wants to publicize the existence of false glideslope indications that could cause the aircraft, when coupled to the autopilot, to pitch up rather than down. The insights were gathered during an investigation into a pitch-up incident on a Boeing 737 in which the incident “digressed” until the aircraft’s stick shaker activated.

The board wants pilots to understand the dangerous information these false glideslope signals can send to an aircraft’s autopilot that might cause the system to operate in a manner opposite to what the cockpit crew expects.

June 2, 2014 - 4:45pm

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada’s final report on the 2012 crash of a Cessna 208B Caravan concluded the stall-induced accident was the result of the pilot’s decision to depart Snow Lake, Manitoba, with the aircraft weighing 600 pounds more than its maximum allowable gross weight and with ice clinging to the wing and tail surfaces. The Cessna Caravan, operated by Gogal Air Services, left Snow Lake on Nov.

May 20, 2014 - 3:50am

Safe Flight Instrument (Booth 5251) introduced at EBACE 2014 its new Icing Conditions Detector (ICD). The patented optical ICD provides an alert that icing conditions exist before ice can accrete on the aircraft. Comprised of a single line replaceable unit, the system is ideal for operations in all modes of flight, according to Safe Flight.

May 3, 2014 - 12:55am

Aviation Performance Solutions has convinced operators of the value of upset prevention and recovery training (UPRT). The Mesa, Ariz.-based company has expanded its customer base rapidly even during the economic slump and is now pushing to take its message around the world.

As APS founder Paul “BJ” Ransbury told AIN, professional pilots “walk away from [our training] with dramatically increased chances to prevent an accident.”

April 2, 2014 - 3:47pm
Asiana Boeing 777-200ER at SFO

While Asiana Airlines acknowledged the culpability of its pilots in the loss of airspeed that ultimately caused the July 6 crash of one of the carrier’s Boeing 777-200ERs on approach to San Francisco International Airport, it also blamed the design of the airplane itself, describing as “inadequate” the warning system to alert the flight crew that the autothrottle had stopped maintaining airspeed.

 
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