Stall

December 9, 2013 - 2:15pm

In an online forum, a professional pilot wondered whether he might be incorrectly controlling the aircraft when he performed a slip on final approach because the airspeed always increased, not decreased as he’d been taught. Slips in transport aircraft are sometimes restricted or even prohibited, making it hard for pilots to know how to handle them when they are required.

November 25, 2013 - 1:52pm

When the FAA amended aircraft stall training last year to emphasize reducing angle of attack over the long-used procedure of limiting altitude loss above all else, training organizations across the U.S. were required to update their curriculums to reflect those changes.

November 15, 2013 - 9:00pm
The FAA is to issue a new rule governing stall training for airline pilots based on industry input recommending improved approaches for dealing with loss of control in flight, said to be the leading cause of aircraft fatalities.

The FAA is due to issue a rule requiring a new approach to stall training for airline pilots that runs counter to previous guidance. According to Dr. Jeff Schroeder, the agency’s chief scientific and technical officer, the new approach will “take a lot of work to undo previous training because some pilots are ‘spring-loaded’ to the previous technique.”

November 11, 2013 - 2:31pm

The FAA issued a rule on November 5 specifically aimed at improving advanced pilot training for Part 121 pilots. The regulation is a direct result of a U.S. Congressional mandate following the 2009 crash of Colgan Flight 3407 near Buffalo, N.Y., in which the pilots first stalled and then lost control of the aircraft on approach.

November 11, 2013 - 1:58pm

Ronald Shabbot pleaded guilty on October 22 to falsifying an FAA return-to-service tag on an aircraft computer indicator. He was sentenced to 24 months probation. While working as a salesman at an aircraft parts repair facility in Fort Worth, Shabbot stole a computer indicator from inventory. He then forged another repair facility’s information on a return-to-service tag, indicating the part was in good working order and could be installed on an aircraft. Shabbot then advertised and sold the computer indicator on eBay.

November 4, 2013 - 2:47pm

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has released a research report examining every incident of stall warning activation between 2008 and 2012 in transport-category aircraft operating in Australian airspace. The incidents recorded in the October 31 report include both local aircraft as well as those of foreign registry.

November 2, 2013 - 1:12am

Among the operational topics for the technical committee at the triennial ICAO Assembly were significant safety issues. One paper from the Russian delegation provided a description of extensive studies of wake vortices, and the development of a wake vortex safety system that would use outputs from ADS-B, Swim and two Aviation System Block Upgrades 1 elements, with pilot alerts transmitted over the anticipated datalinks in that period–that is, by 2018.

November 2, 2013 - 12:25am
Redbird’s RedHawk

For many pilots, the first exposure to the benefits of an angle-of-attack (AOA) indicating system comes during their first simulator session toward a business jet or airliner type rating. Because fewer pilots are entering the world of professional flying via the military–which actively uses AOA systems–and general aviation training airplanes are rarely AOA equipped, new civilian pilots get little exposure to AOA indicators and their safety benefits.

October 21, 2013 - 2:00am
Flight Research of Mojave, Calif., teaches upset recognition and recovery in Sabre 60s as well as single-engine Aermacchi MB-326 Impalas.

Flight Research (Booth No. N515) is holding a one-hour seminar free to NBAA convention attendees who are interested in learning more about how to prevent loss-of-control accidents. The seminar, entitled “Loss of Control Preparation & Prevention–Danger in the Training Gap,” will be offered today and tomorrow at Palmer Room One at the Wynn Hotel. For reservations, call Flight Research at (661) 824-4136.

October 14, 2013 - 2:40pm

The FAA this month will issue a rule requiring a new approach to stall training for airline pilots that runs counter to previous guidance. According to Dr Jeff Schroeder, the agency’s chief scientific and technical officer, the new approach will, “take a lot of work to undo previous training because some pilots are ‘spring-loaded’ to the previous technique.”

 
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